Venice

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Ven·ice

 (vĕn′ĭs)
1. A city of northeast Italy on islets within a lagoon in the Gulf of Venice, an inlet of the Adriatic Sea. Founded in the 6th century ad by refugees fleeing the Lombard invaders who had gained control of the mainland, it became a major maritime power by the 13th century and spread its influence over northern Italy and the eastern Mediterranean by the 15th century. Its territories were gradually lost to the Turks, and in 1797 it passed to Austria. Venice was ceded to Italy in 1866. It is a tourist and commercial center known for its canals.
2. A district of Los Angeles, California, on Santa Monica Bay. Laid out with canals in the early 1900s, it is known for its beach and bohemian culture.

Venice

(ˈvɛnɪs)
n
(Placename) a port in NE Italy, capital of Veneto region, built on over 100 islands and mud flats in the Lagoon of Venice (an inlet of the Gulf of Venice at the head of the Adriatic): united under the first doge in 697 ad; became an independent republic and a great commercial and maritime power, defeating Genoa, the greatest rival, in 1380; contains the Grand Canal and about 170 smaller canals, providing waterways for city transport. Pop: 271 073 (2001). Italian name: Venezia

Ven•ice

(ˈvɛn ɪs)

n.
1. Italian, Venezia. a seaport in NE Italy, built on numerous small islands in the Lagoon of Venice. 361,722.
2. Gulf of, the N arm of the Adriatic Sea.
3. Lagoon of, an inlet of the Gulf of Venice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Venice - the provincial capital of VenetoVenice - the provincial capital of Veneto; built on 118 islands within a lagoon in the Gulf of Venice; has canals instead of streets; one of Italy's major ports and a famous tourist attraction
Venetia, Veneto, Venezia-Euganea - a region of northeastern Italy on the Adriatic
Grand Canal - the major waterway in Venice, Italy
Venetian - a resident of Venice
Translations
Benátky
Venetsia
Velence
Venezia
Wenecja
Benátky
Benetke
Venedig

Venice

[ˈvenɪs] NVenecia f

Venice

[ˈvɛnɪs] nVenise

Venice

nVenedig nt

Venice

[ˈvɛnɪs] nVenezia
References in classic literature ?
Six hundred years ago, Venice was the Autocrat of Commerce; her mart was the great commercial centre, the distributing-house from whence the enormous trade of the Orient was spread abroad over the Western world.
We reached Venice at eight in the evening, and entered a hearse belonging to the Grand Hotel d'Europe.
Their name had been mixed up ages before with one of the greatest names of the century, and they lived now in Venice in obscurity, on very small means, unvisited, unapproachable, in a dilapidated old palace on an out-of-the-way canal: this was the substance of my friend's impression of them.
Prest, half-sententiously and yet also somewhat as if she were ashamed of making a speech so little in the real tone of Venice.
From Venice," he said, with a trace of Italian accent.
Don't talk about Venice to our Doge," put in the fiddle, "or you will start him off, and he has stowed away a couple of bottles as it is-- has the prince
IN this chapter I am going to tell you in a few words the story of one of Shakespeare's plays called The Merchant of Venice.
The merchant of Venice was a rich young man called Antonio.
The post of the morning had brought a letter to the secretary from a courier then at Venice.
Aldus Manutius (Aldine edition), Venice, 1495 (complete works).
John Hay, who did not know me except as a young Westerner who had written poems in the Atlantic Monthly, asked me how I would like Venice, and promised that they would have the salary put up to a thousand a year, under the new law to embarrass privateers.
We left Venice before Mr and Mrs Gowan did, but they were not so long upon the road as we were, and did not travel by the same way, and so when we arrived we found them in a lodging here, in a place called the Via Gregoriana.