Venus


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Venus
false-color image produced from radar images taken by the Magellan probe

Ve·nus

 (vē′nəs)
n.
1. Roman Mythology The goddess of love and beauty.
2. The second planet from the sun, having an average radius of 6,052 kilometers (3,761 miles), a mass 0.82 times that of Earth, and a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 224.7 days at a mean distance of approximately 108.2 million kilometers (67.2 million miles).

[Middle English, from Old English, from Latin, love, Venus; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]

Venus

(ˈviːnəs)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the Roman goddess of love. Greek counterpart: Aphrodite
2. (Anatomy) mount of Venus See mons veneris

Venus

(ˈviːnəs)
n
1. (Celestial Objects) one of the inferior planets and the second nearest to the sun, visible as a bright morning or evening star. Its surface is extremely hot (over 400°C) and is completely shrouded by dense cloud. The atmosphere is principally carbon dioxide. Mean distance from sun: 108 million km; period of revolution around sun: 225 days; period of axial rotation: 244.3 days (retrograde motion); diameter and mass: 96.5 and 81.5 per cent that of earth respectively
2. (Alchemy) the alchemical name for copper1

Ve•nus

(ˈvi nəs)

n., pl. -us•es.
1. an ancient Italian goddess, identified by the Romans with Aphrodite as the goddess of love and beauty.
2. an exceptionally beautiful woman.
3. the most brilliant planet, second in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 7521 miles (12,104 km), a mean distance from the sun of 67.2 million miles (108.2 million km), a period of revolution of 224.68 days, and no moons.
4. Also called Ve′nus fig`ure. (sometimes l.c.) a statuette of a female figure, usu. carved of ivory and typically having exaggerated breasts, belly, or buttocks, often found in Upper Paleolithic cultures from Siberia to France.
[< Latin Venus, s. Vener- orig. a neuter common n. meaning “physical desire,” hence “qualities exciting desire, charm,” “a goddess personifying sexual attractiveness”; c. Skt vanaḥ desire, akin to wish; compare venerate, venom]

Ve·nus

(vē′nəs)
The second planet from the sun and the fourth smallest, with a diameter about 400 miles less than that of Earth. Venus comes nearer to Earth than any other planet and is the brightest object in the night sky aside from Earth's moon. It is the hottest planet in the solar system, with an average surface temperature of 867°F (464°C). See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Venus - the second nearest planet to the sunVenus - the second nearest planet to the sun; it is peculiar in that its rotation is slow and retrograde (in the opposite sense of the Earth and all other planets except Uranus); it is visible from Earth as an early `morning star' or an `evening star'; "before it was known that they were the same object the evening star was called Venus and the morning star was called Lucifer"
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
2.Venus - goddess of loveVenus - goddess of love; counterpart of Greek Aphrodite
3.Venus - type genus of the family Veneridae: genus of edible clams with thick oval shells
mollusk genus - a genus of mollusks
family Veneridae, Veneridae - hard-shell clams
Mercenaria mercenaria, hard clam, Venus mercenaria, hard-shell clam, quahaug, quahog, round clam - an edible American clam; the heavy shells were used as money by some American Indians
Translations
Венера
Venuše
Venus
VeenusVenus
Venus
Venera
Vénusz
Venus
Venus
Venera
Wenus
Venus
Venera
Венера
Venus
Венера
Sao Kim

Venus

[ˈviːnəs] N (Myth) → Venus f (Astron) → Venus m

Venus

[ˈviːnəs] n
(= planet) → Vénus f
(= goddess) → vénus f

Venus

nVenus f

Venus

[ˈviːnəs] n (Astron, Myth) → Venere f
References in classic literature ?
Venus rising from the foam could have presented no more entrancing a spectacle than Mrs.
Bards have written of the cestus of Venus, that turned the heads of all the world in successive generations.
If I ventured to describe that attitude, there would be a fine howl--but there the Venus lies, for anybody to gloat over that wants to--and there she has a right to lie, for she is a work of art, and Art has its privileges.
Magdalen's first glance at this Venus of the autumn period of female life more than satisfied her that she had done well to feel her ground in disguise before she ventured on matching herself against Mrs.
For indeed the moonlight that fell across her bosom was not whiter than my thoughts, nor could any kiss--were it even such a kiss as Venus promised to the betrayer of Psyche--even in its fiercest delirium, be other than dross compared with the wild white peace of those silent hours when we lay thus married and maiden side by side.
Conrade read the letter, which was in these words: ``Aymer, by divine grace, Prior of the Cistertian house of Saint Mary's of Jorvaulx, to Sir Brian de Bois-Guilbert, a Knight of the holy Order of the Temple, wisheth health, with the bounties of King Bacchus and of my Lady Venus.
Sur une gamme chromatique, Le sein de peries ruisselant, La Venus de l'Adriatique Sort de l'eau son corps rose et blanc.
But everybody knew how perfect an instrument her voice was; and there was no display of anger, but only of horror and dismay, the sort of dismay which men would have felt if they had witnessed the catastrophe that broke the arms of the Venus de Milo.
Thou hast jilted a maiden As fair to behold As nymph of Diana Or Venus of old.
Hers was a Norman beauty, fresh, high-colored, redundant, the flesh of Rubens covering the muscles of the Farnese Hercules, and not the slender articulations of the Venus de' Medici, Apollo's graceful consort.
Seven months ago now, Venus and Mars were in alignment with the sun; that is to say, Mars was in opposition from the point of view of an observer on Venus.
A young and beautiful girl, with hair as black as jet, her eyes as velvety as the gazelle's, was leaning with her back against the wainscot, rubbing in her slender delicately moulded fingers a bunch of heath blossoms, the flowers of which she was picking off and strewing on the floor; her arms, bare to the elbow, brown, and modelled after those of the Arlesian Venus, moved with a kind of restless impatience, and she tapped the earth with her arched and supple foot, so as to display the pure and full shape of her well-turned leg, in its red cotton, gray and blue clocked, stocking.