auxiliary verb

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auxiliary verb

Auxiliary verbs (also called helping verbs) are verbs that add functional meaning to other “main” or “full” verbs in a clause. They are used to create different tenses or aspects, to form negatives and interrogatives, or to add emphasis to a sentence. However, they do not have semantic meaning unto themselves.
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auxiliary verb

n. Abbr. aux. or aux. v.
A verb, such as have, can, or will, that accompanies the main verb in a clause and helps to make distinctions in mood, voice, aspect, and tense.

auxiliary verb

n
(Grammar) a verb used to indicate the tense, voice, mood, etc, of another verb where this is not indicated by inflection, such as English will in he will go, was in he was eating and he was eaten, do in I do like you, etc

auxil′iary verb′


n.
a verb used in construction with certain forms of other verbs, as infinitives or participles, to express distinctions of tense, aspect, mood, etc., as did in Did you go?, have in We have spoken, or can in They can see. Also called helping verb.
[1755–65]

auxiliary verb

A verb that accompanies and augments the meaning of a main verb, for example, “can” in “can do.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auxiliary verb - a verb that combines with another verb in a verb phrase to help form tense, mood, voice, or condition of the verb it combines with
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
modal, modal auxiliary, modal auxiliary verb, modal verb - an auxiliary verb (such as `can' or `will') that is used to express modality
Translations
pomocné sloveso
apuverbi
segédige
hjálparsagnorðhjálparsögn
조동사
yardımcı fiil
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, to teach the verbal auxiliary is, the clinic ian needs sentences (combined or ordered verbal operants of different classes): The boy is running, The girl is smiling, and so forth (Hegde, 1980).
Most of these deal with small points of grammar, although one, [section]420, is a rather lengthy list, arranged alphabetically, of verbs that can be used as one or another type of verbal auxiliary.
Even such basic grammatical-structural distinctions as verbal auxiliary copula and subject noun-object noun do not hold good under experimental manipulations inherent to treatment (Hegde, 1980; Hegde, & McConn, 1978; Hegde, Noll, & Pecora, 1979; McReynolds & Engmann, 1974).