Verde River


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Ver·de River

 (vûr′dē, vĕr′-)
A river, about 300 km (190 mi) long, of central Arizona flowing generally southeast to the Salt River.
References in periodicals archive ?
Collections were performed in the following areas: the Verde River (municipality of Sorriso), which is categorized as having a low density of cevas with approximately one ceva for each 1000 m stretch of river; the Celeste River (municipality of Vera), categorized as having a medium density of cevas with approximately one ceva for every 500 m stretch of river; the Teles Pires River (municipality of Sinop), classified as having a high density of cevas, with approximately one ceva for every 100 m stretch of river; the Tapaiuna River (municipality of Nova Canaa do Norte), which does not currently have cevas, although it is close to the cevas system; and the Cristalino River (municipality of Novo Mundo), which is the control treatment as it lies within a conservation unit.
Most of these fish species, found in the Verde River Basin, already are threatened or endangered.
Located 40 miles northeast of Phoenix, Arizona, Rio Verde was built between the Verde River, the Tonto National Forest, and McDowell Mountain Regional Park.
The desert landscape is contrasted by the Verde River, which flows north to south through the reservation.
Camp Verde itself is surrounded by the towering Red Rocks, tumbling down to a fertile valley with the Verde river snaking through.
5 miles between spectacular limestone cliffs down the peaceful Verde river - with the promise of wine at the finish driving me on through the gentle rapids.
5 miles between limestone cliffs down the peaceful Verde river - with the promise of wine at the finish driving me on through the gentle rapids.
Much of the protected area did not require additional clearing since it was in close proximity to the already-cleared path of the El Paso line; however, a unique crossing was required at the protected Verde River in the Prescott National Forest.
57) Following several years of fighting, the Apache and later some Yavapai were confined to the eight-hundred-square-mile Rio Verde Reservation along the upper Verde River.
It heard from local speakers on the challenges faced by Arizona's Verde River watershed, and received a presentation on a new public awareness campaign from the American Water Works Association titled "Only Tap Water Delivers.
Overlooking the fertile Verde River Valley, the town appears either to be struggling to climb up or waiting to drop down the steep inclines.