Vicar of Bray


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Vicar of Bray

(breɪ)
n
1. (Biography) a vicar (Simon Aleyn) appointed to the parish of Bray in Berkshire during Henry VIII's reign who changed his faith to Catholic when Mary I was on the throne and back to Protestant when Elizabeth I succeeded and so retained his living
2. (Music, other) Also called: In Good King Charles's Golden Days a ballad in which the vicar's changes of faith are transposed to the Stuart period
3. a person who changes his or her views or allegiances in accordance with what is suitable at the time
References in periodicals archive ?
I believe if a trainer is optimistic about the chances of his horses, that optimism should be acted upon without prevarication or insurance - so I had a single bet: a four-horse accumulator on Southampton, Vicar Of Bray, Ask The Governor and Glove Puppet.
I can't think of any other historical period where attitudes to sex have been turned upside down quite so fast, except during the English Civil War when the government in power switched from licentious Cavaliers to puritanical Roundheads and back again, and people like the Vicar of Bray tried to hang onto their jobs by agreeing with everybody.
THE old song about the Vicar of Bray is as appropriate today as it was when it first emerged "Whatever king may reign, I
The range of topics covered is enormous: books, revenge, sport, Old George's Almanac, freedom and happiness, radio programmes, murder, the colonial empire, the Vicar of Bray (in legend, not the current incumbent), 'Confessions of a Book Reviewer'--are but some of the essays included here.
For Brother Straw, I have a beautiful, leather-bound copy of The Vicar Of Bray.
Duffy harbors great sympathy for Christopher Trychay--the center of it all--though some readers (this one included) may hold less generous views of a priest who can come across as somewhat nasty at times, with his stern hectorings and his obsession with raising funds to purchase black vestments; while Duffy also insists upon Trychay's continued traditionalism, the priest did persist through the reigns and take the required oaths, thus giving him more than a passing resemblance to the time-serving Vicar of Bray.