Victorianism


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Related to Victorianism: modernism

Vic·to·ri·an·ism

 (vĭk-tôr′ē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. The state or quality of being Victorian, as in attitude, style, or taste.
2. Something exhibiting Victorian characteristics.

Victorianism

the affection for or emulation of Victorian tastes or thoughts.
See also: Behavior
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References in periodicals archive ?
People in those days had one thing we have in abundance: An urge to rebel against the current reality - in their case against the brutalities of industrialisation, the rigidities of Victorianism, the stale formulas of academic thinking.
Asked about the term's changing usage, the 54-year-old replied: "There is a kind of new Victorianism.
Instead, he argues, James already carried within himself a colonial frame of reference that adapted Victorianism and Arnoldianism to the specific circumstances of the Caribbean.
To understand how that happened we need to keep in mind that both modern feminism and cultural Modernism were self-conscious revolts against Victorianism, which in an act of what Ann Douglas has called generational matricide, swept up with it the Victorians' Romantic predecessors.
This sensibility accords with the ideological discourses and politics of the sexual revolution--contemporaneous with the novel's moment of publication--with its overarching reclamation of sexuality and libidinal forces from a Victorianism or moral compass that would glorify sex as precious or necessitate reserve and sexual abstention.
The shift from Victorianism to modernism has commonly been ascribed to the employment of antirealist narrative schemes by late-Victorian novelists.
The Poetry of Modern Life: On the Pavement"; Adam Piette, "Modernist Victorianism"; and David Wheatley, "'Dispatched Dark Regions Far Afield and Farther': Contemporary Poetry and Victorianism.
Although late Victorianism would seem only tangentially related to Amish Country, Trollinger argues convincingly that the gentle ambience of Walnut Creek recalls for tourists "a time when all was right in America, where work was meaningful, families were well ordered and leisure was plentiful" (73).
Irish novelists and the Victorian age should be an indispensable read for literary critic and historian alike, if only to remind us of the range and potential richness of these texts as sources for a re-evaluation of Ireland's relationship with Victorianism, and indeed fiction itself.
a compelling alternative and serviceable post-homosexual mode and metaphor for art, in the sense that Victorianism can now be seen as a metaphor for art.
By defining Bloomsbury in this manner, Wolfe answers why Bloomsbury avoided manifestos and instead articulated its project(s) in terms of intimacy: unlike the radical politics of the avant-garde futurists or surrealists, Bloomsbury cultivated an insider-outsider perspective that stressed an =bivalent continuity with Victorianism rather than a utopian or apocalyptic break (the stock-in-trade of the manifesto).
Wolfe argues that "Bloomsbury's modernism--as an ambivalent response both to modernity and to Victorianism, informed by Freud--has never been explicitly formulated.