Victorianism


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Related to Victorianism: modernism

Vic·to·ri·an·ism

 (vĭk-tôr′ē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. The state or quality of being Victorian, as in attitude, style, or taste.
2. Something exhibiting Victorian characteristics.

Victorianism

the affection for or emulation of Victorian tastes or thoughts.
See also: Behavior
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Panopticon care unit itself, noted earlier as a residue of Victorianism, gothically haunts the corridors of an otherwise contemporary setting.
Ruins of Paper: Dickens and the Necropolitan Library" Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net 47 (2007).
In 1837 Pickwick is published, followed by a new wave of realistic novels, mostly concentrated on the acute social problems of the apparently prosperous Victorianism.
Opens with an overview of the cultural influence of Victorianism on the Oak Park area and the Hemingway household in particular before moving into an examination of classic Victorian themes found in EH's early "Up in Michigan," "My Old Man," and "Out of Season.
Hemans and Home: Victorianism, Feminine 'Internal Enemies,' and the Domestication of National Identity.
Keaton is the silent comedian whom contemporary critics have largely favored over Chaplin, representing twentieth and twenty-first century modernism and displaying an emotional coolness in contrast to Chaplin's nineteenth century Victorianism and sentimentality.
a compelling alternative and serviceable post-homosexual mode and metaphor for art, in the sense that Victorianism can now be seen as a metaphor for art.
Furthermore, see Gay's (1984-1998) monumental historical description of the bourgeois experience from Victorianism onwards, denigrating the supposed "mental" and "bodily" rigidity usually attached to conceptions of Victorianism.
If Corley's outrageous High Victorianism proved susceptible to a queer reading, the same ironically applies to modernism's supposed alternative.
Mexico's European-and-Indian soul," writes Rick Bayless, the high priest of the "authentic" Mexican food movement, in his creatively rifled book, Authentic Mexican, "feels the intuitions of neither bare-bones Victorianism nor Anglo-Saxon productivity"--a line reminiscent of dispatches from the Raj.
Genius is the abyss and the sudden voice and force arising from it, not typical antiquity, Victorianism, and postmodernism.