village

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vil·lage

 (vĭl′ĭj)
n.
1. A small group of dwellings in a rural area, usually ranking in size between a hamlet and a town.
2. In some US states, an incorporated community smaller in population than a town.
3. The inhabitants of a village; villagers.
4. A dense group of animal habitations: a prairie dog village.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vīllāticum, farmstead, from neuter of vīllāticus, of a villa or farmstead, from vīlla, country house, farm; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

village

(ˈvɪlɪdʒ)
n
1. (Human Geography) a small group of houses in a country area, larger than a hamlet
2. (Human Geography) the inhabitants of such a community collectively
3. (Human Geography) an incorporated municipality smaller than a town in various parts of the US and Canada
4. (Biology) a group of habitats of certain animals
5. (Human Geography) NZ a self-contained city area having its own shops, etc
6. (Human Geography) (modifier) of, relating to, or characteristic of a village: a village green.
[C15: from Old French, from ville farm, from Latin: villa]
ˈvillage-ˌlike adj

vil•lage

(ˈvɪl ɪdʒ)

n.
1. a small community or group of houses in a rural area, larger than a hamlet and usu. smaller than a town, sometimes incorporated as a municipality.
2. the inhabitants of such a community collectively.
3. a group of animal dwellings resembling a village.
adj.
4. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a village.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French < Latin villāticum, neuter of villāticus villatic]

Village

 a small group or cluster of burrows of the prairie dog. 18008; a collection of dwelling houses and other buildings, 1386; the occupants of a village, collectively.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.village - a community of people smaller than a townvillage - a community of people smaller than a town
community - a group of people living in a particular local area; "the team is drawn from all parts of the community"
moshav - a cooperative Israeli village or settlement comprised of small farms
2.village - a settlement smaller than a townvillage - a settlement smaller than a town  
settlement - an area where a group of families live together
campong, kampong - a native village in Malaysia
kraal - a village of huts for native Africans in southern Africa; usually surrounded by a stockade
pueblo - a communal village built by Indians in the southwestern United States
3.Village - a mainly residential district of Manhattan; `the Village' became a home for many writers and artists in the 20th century
Greater New York, New York, New York City - the largest city in New York State and in the United States; located in southeastern New York at the mouth of the Hudson river; a major financial and cultural center
Translations
سُكّان القَرْيَهقَرْيَةقَرْيَه
село
vesnicevesnický
landsbylandsby-by
küla
ده
kylä
selo
falu
òorpòorpsbúar
むら
마을
rus
kaimo gyventojas
ciema/ciemata iedzīvotājiciematsciems
sat
dedina
vas
by
kijiji
หมู่บ้าน
köyköy halkıköylülernahiye
làng

village

[ˈvɪlɪdʒ]
A. Npueblo m; (= small) → aldea f, pueblito m (LAm)
B. CPD village church Niglesia f del pueblo
village cricket Ncríquet m pueblerino
village green Nprado m comunal, campo m comunal
village hall Nsala f del pueblo
village idiot Ntonto m del lugar
village life Nla vida rural, la vida de pueblo
village shop, village store Ntienda f del pueblo

village

[ˈvɪlɪdʒ]
nvillage m
modif [atmosphere, life] → villageois(e); [pub, inn, shop, store, elders] → du villagevillage green npré m communalvillage hall n (British)salle f des fêtesvillage idiot nidiot m du village

village

nDorf nt

village

in cpdsDorf-;
village green
nDorfwiese for -anger m
village hall
nGemeindesaal m
village idiot
nDorftrottel m (inf)

village

[ˈvɪlɪdʒ]
1. npaese m, villaggio
2. adj (of a village, villages) → di paese; (local) → del paese
a village inn → una locanda di paese
the village inn → la locanda del paese
the village idiot → lo scemo del villaggio

village

(ˈvilidʒ) noun
1. a group of houses etc which is smaller than a town. They live in a little village; (also adjective) a village school.
2. the people who live in such a group of houses. The whole village turned out to see the celebrations.
ˈvillager noun
a person who lives in a village.

village

قَرْيَة vesnice landsby Dorf χωριό pueblo kylä village selo paese 마을 dorp landsby wieś aldeia, vila деревня by หมู่บ้าน köy làng 村庄
References in classic literature ?
Before them the natives fled in alarm, so that they found only deserted villages in their path as they proceeded.
For I would have you know, Sir Errant, that in these little villages everything is talked about and everything is carped at, and rest assured, as I am, that the priest must be over and above good who forces his parishioners to speak well of him, especially in villages.
We let in the Jungle upon five villages; and in those villages, and in their lands, the grazing-ground and the soft crop-grounds, there is not one man to-day who takes his food from the ground.
The custom of most Indian villages is for a few boys to take the cattle and buffaloes out to graze in the early morning, and bring them back at night.
From a lofty perch Tarzan viewed the village of thatched huts across the intervening plantation.
Hunt always keeping some distance in the advance, lest Lisa should push on and get first to the Arickara village.
There was a change on the village where the fountain fell, and where the mender of roads went forth daily to hammer out of the stones on the highway such morsels of bread as might serve for patches to hold his poor ignorant soul and his poor reduced body together.
This offered itself in the village of Ashtabula, in the northeastern part of the State, and there we all found ourselves one moonlight night of early summer.
An elder was likewise there, who had made a pilgrimage of a thousand miles from a village of the faithful in Kentucky, to visit his spiritual kindred, the children of the sainted mother Ann.
Having set off in the small hours of the fourteenth, accompanied by a bugler and two Cossacks, Balashev reached the French outposts at the village of Rykonty, on the Russian side of the Niemen, by dawn.
Every day or two I strolled to the village to hear some of the gossip which is incessantly going on there, circulating either from mouth to mouth, or from newspaper to newspaper, and which, taken in homoeopathic doses, was really as refreshing in its way as the rustle of leaves and the peeping of frogs.
The noise of their battle with Numa had drawn an excited horde of savages from the nearby village, and a moment after the lion's death the two men were surrounded by lithe, ebon warriors, gesticulating and jabbering--a thousand questions that drowned each ventured reply.