villagization


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villagization

(ˌvɪlɪdʒaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

villagisation

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the (often compulsory) resettlement of people into particular villages by the military or government
References in periodicals archive ?
The villagization of production, a key component of the Ujamaa plan, essentially collectivized all forms of local productive capacity.
Kjekshus (1977) demonstrated, though historical analysis and arguments of rural planning, the centrality of the Ujamaa policy, and its villagization component, to the Tanzanian development strategy.
That is why the Government has introduced a villagization program in the repatriation and reintegration in Burundi as emergency response d- the reintegration of persons affected by the crisis for which a single d- Setup in a dispersed rural settlement would be impossible .
Many African civilians were killed, a program of villagization (in so-called "aldeamentos") was introduced to concentrate the survivors along roads accessible to police and military vehicles, and the majority of the region's inhabitants fled to already-independent Congo.
In both Mozambique's RENAMO war and Ethiopia's Derg war, significant grievances surfaced as a result of government villagization programs.
219) Additionally, Rwanda's villagization program has relocated hundreds of thousands of people into new villages from hillside farms.
President Julius Nyerere, 'father' and philosopher of Tanzanian socialism, justified villagization on the grounds of being better able to provide basic services, such as medical clinics, schools, and clean water, to the citizenry.
Reorganization of property Tanzania, 1961-73 Gradual rights by fiat and forced villagization under pressure from socialist ideals 5.
Just think of the Great Leap Forward in China, agricultural collectivization in Russia, or compulsory villagization in Tanzania, Mozambique and Ethiopia.
The African American experience of nearly three and one-half centuries of racial slavery and segregation is paralleled by Oromos suffering under Ethiopian settler colonialism, which practiced slavery, semi-slavery (the naftanya-gabbar system), tenancy and share cropping, forced villagization, and collectivization for just over a century (see Jalata, 1993).
It involved enforced villagization and stock reduction through the manipulation of tribal authorities and even the use of the armed forces.
It may well have been the poorer for decades of British and German colonial rule, but its disparate ethical groups and local communities were hardly prostrate when villagization began--a point Scott convincingly demonstrates.