Viollet-le-Duc


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Related to Viollet-le-Duc: Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc

Viol·let-le-Duc

 (vē′ə-lā′lə-do͞ok′, -dyo͞ok′, vyô-lĕ′lə-dük′), Eugène Emmanuel 1814-1879.
French architect. A leader of the Gothic revival in France, he designed the restoration of the city of Carcassonne and supervised the refurbishment of many medieval buildings, including Notre Dame in Paris.

Viollet-le-Duc

(French vjɔlɛlədyk)
n
(Biography) Eugène Emmanuel (øʒɛn ɛmanɥɛl). 1814–79, French architect and leader of the Gothic Revival in France, noted for his dictionary of French architecture (1854–68) and for his restoration of medieval buildings

Viol•let-le-Duc

(vyɔˈlɛ ləˈdük)

n.
Eugène Emmanuel, 1814–79, French architect and writer.
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In Delirious New York (1978), an epic tale of the birth of New York, he fixated on the grid and the elevator as the defining characteristics of Manhattan; in 'Cronocaos', shown at the 2010 Biennale he delivered a critical history of conservation and the act of listing buildings from Viollet-le-Duc to the present day, concluding that soon buildings would be listed prior to being finished.
A cette epoque, la notion de patrimoine, "mot et chose [much less than] modernes [much greater than] pour reprendre les paroles du celebre architecte-restaurateur francais Eugene Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (1), demeure centree sur la restauration des monuments historiques.
It was rescued 200 years later by the architect Viollet-le-Duc and his restoration far surpassed the original.
He includes Paul Frankl, Otto von Simson, Aby Warburg, Eugene Viollet-le-Duc and Meyer Schapiro in his explication of Gothic interpretations alongside less expected figures including Mies van der Rohe and Alois Riegl, the latter of which are treated in the section on 'Ornament, Style and Space'.
From the 1850s the city was restored under an ambitious project led by architect, Eugene Viollet-le-Duc, and it now resembles a fairytale castle with conical turrets and dramatic gateways.
From the 1850s the cit was restored under an ambitious project lead by one architect, Eugene Viollet-le-Duc, and it now resembles a fairytale castle with conical turrets and dramatic gateways.
From the 1850s the cite was restored under an ambitious project lead by one architect, Eugene Viollet-le-Duc, and it now resembles a fairy-tale castle with conical turrets and dramatic gateways.
Eugene Viollet-le-Duc, the principal architect, had firm ideas about how it should be done: "To restore an edifice is not to maintain it, repair it or remake it, it is to re-establish it in a complete state that may never have existed at a given moment.
Photography', wrote French Gothic Revival architect Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc, 'seems to have arrived just in time to assist the great work of restoring ancient edifices'.
What you see today is the work of 19th century restorer and medieval enthusiast Viollet-le-Duc who painstakingly oversaw the impressive reconstruction of the citadel.
The rescuers won, and in 1844 France's famous architect and great restorer, Eugene Viollet-le-Duc (1814-79).
A campaign succeeded in saving La Cite and in 1844 architect Eugene Viollet-le-Duc began its restoration, stirring controversy by adding roofs to towers previously open to the skies.