Virgil


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Vir·gil

also Ver·gil  (vûr′jəl) Originally Publius Vergilius Maro. 70-19 bc.
Roman poet who composed the Aeneid, an epic telling of the wanderings of Aeneas after the sack of Troy.

Vir·gil′i·an (vûr-jĭl′ē-ən, -jĭl′yən) adj.

Virgil

(ˈvɜːdʒɪl) or

Vergil

n
(Biography) Latin name Publius Vergilius Maro. 70–19 bc, Roman poet, patronized by Maecenas. The Eclogues (42–37), ten pastoral poems, and the Georgics (37–30), four books on the art of farming, established Virgil as the foremost poet of his age. His masterpiece is the Aeneid (30–19)
Virˈgilian, Verˈgilian adj

Vir•gil

(ˈvɜr dʒəl)

n.
(Publius Vergilius Maro) 70–19 B.C., Roman poet: author of The Aeneid.
Vir•gil•i•an (vərˈdʒɪl i ən, -ˈdʒɪl yən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Virgil - a Roman poetVirgil - a Roman poet; author of the epic poem `Aeneid' (70-19 BC)
Translations

Virgil

[ˈvɜːdʒɪl] NVirgilio

Virgil

nVergil(ius) m, → Virgil m

Virgil

[ˈvɜːdʒɪl] nVirgilio
References in classic literature ?
But, as they are merely school-boys now, their business is to construe Virgil.
Nay, number (itself) in armies importeth not much, where the people is of weak courage; for (as Virgil saith) It never troubles a wolf, how many the sheep be.
Hence Virgil, through the mouth of Dido, excuses the inhumanity of her reign owing to its being new, saying:
I remember vividly another evening, when something led us to talk of Dante's veneration for Virgil.
When not engaged in reading Virgil, Homer, or Mistral, in parks, restaurants, streets, and suchlike public places, he indited sonnets (in French) to the eyes, ears, chin, hair, and other visible perfections of a nymph called Therese, the daughter, honesty compels me to state, of a certain Madame Leonore who kept a small cafe for sailors in one of the narrowest streets of the old town.
He spends the whole day in settling whether Homer expressed himself correctly or not in such and such a line of the Iliad, whether Martial was indecent or not in such and such an epigram, whether such and such lines of Virgil are to be understood in this way or in that; in short, all his talk is of the works of these poets, and those of Horace, Perseus, Juvenal, and Tibullus; for of the moderns in our own language he makes no great account; but with all his seeming indifference to Spanish poetry, just now his thoughts are absorbed in making a gloss on four lines that have been sent him from Salamanca, which I suspect are for some poetical tournament.
And with regard to what you say, senor, of your son having no great opinion of Spanish poetry, I am inclined to think that he is not quite right there, and for this reason: the great poet Homer did not write in Latin, because he was a Greek, nor did Virgil write in Greek, because he was a Latin; in short, all the ancient poets wrote in the language they imbibed with their mother's milk, and never went in quest of foreign ones to express their sublime conceptions; and that being so, the usage should in justice extend to all nations, and the German poet should not be undervalued because he writes in his own language, nor the Castilian, nor even the Biscayan, for writing in his.
I could plainly discover whence one family derives a long chin; why a second has abounded with knaves for two generations, and fools for two more; why a third happened to be crack-brained, and a fourth to be sharpers; whence it came, what Polydore Virgil says of a certain great house, NEC VIR FORTIS, NEC FOEMINA CASTA; how cruelty, falsehood, and cowardice, grew to be characteristics by which certain families are distinguished as much as by their coats of arms; who first brought the pox into a noble house, which has lineally descended scrofulous tumours to their posterity.
Among other volumes of verse on the top shelf of the bookcase, of which I used to look at the outside without penetrating deeply within, were Pope's translation of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and Dryden's Virgil, pretty little tomes in tree-calf, published by James Crissy in Philadelphia, and illustrated with small copper-plates, which somehow seemed to put the matter hopelessly beyond me.
The Saints announced yesterday: "Southampton Football Club can confirm it has reached an agreement with Liverpool over the transfer of Virgil van Dijk.