retinol

(redirected from Vitamin A deficiency)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ret·i·nol

 (rĕt′n-ôl′, -ōl′, -ŏl′)
n.
See vitamin A1.

retinol

(ˈrɛtɪˌnɒl)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) another name for vitamin A2
2. (Elements & Compounds) another name for rosin oil
[C19: from Greek rhētinē resin + -ol1]

vitamin A


n.
a yellow, fat-soluble terpene alcohol, C20H30O, obtained from carotene and occurring in green and yellow vegetables, egg yolk, etc.: essential to the protection of epithelial tissue and the prevention of night blindness. Also called vitamin A1, retinol.
[1920–25]

vitamin A2


n.
a yellow oil, C20H28O, similar to vitamin A, obtained from fish liver.

ret·i·nol

(rĕt′n-ôl′)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retinol - an unsaturated alcohol that occurs in marine fish-liver oils and is synthesized biologically from caroteneretinol - an unsaturated alcohol that occurs in marine fish-liver oils and is synthesized biologically from carotene
antiophthalmic factor, axerophthol, vitamin A, A - any of several fat-soluble vitamins essential for normal vision; prevents night blindness or inflammation or dryness of the eyes
Translations
rétinol

ret·i·nol

n. retinol, vitamina A1.

retinol

n retinol m
References in periodicals archive ?
2) Vitamin A deficiency can result in keratinization of oral mucosa and the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts.
Vitamin A deficiency produces squamous metaplasia with keratin production in duct cells of salivary glands; this results in decreased salivary secretion and xe-rostonnia.
More than 600,000 people, mostly young children and pregnant women, die each year from vitamin A deficiency (Black et al.
1: Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) prevalence (clinical and subclinical) and regions of orange and tangerine production (WHO 2009).
Population-attributable fractions were calculated from South African Vitamin A Consultative Group (SAVACG) survey data on the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in children and the relative risks of associated health problems, applied to revised burden of disease estimates for South Africa in the year 2000.
Vitamin A deficiency affects a large sector of the Sudanese society causing night blindness to many children.
Research has shown that child deaths increase by about 20 per cent in population groups suffering from vitamin A deficiency, which is common in about 70 countries worldwide, most of them in Asia and Africa.
In addition, the water-soluble derivatives could help prevent vitamin A deficiency, which can lead to blindness, in people with genetic abnormalities or diseases that render them unable to absorb fats and fat-soluble vitamins, Barua says.
5 million children from going blind as a result of vitamin A deficiency.
Severe vitamin A deficiency can leadto xerophthalmia (dry-eye disease), a leading cause of blindness among children in the developing world.
Ultra Grains represents a major and singular step forward in the eradication of Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) in children.