hyaluronidase

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hy·a·lu·ron·i·dase

 (hī′ə-lo͝o-rŏn′ĭ-dās′, -dāz′)
n.
An enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of hyaluronic acid in the body, thereby increasing tissue permeability to fluids. Also called spreading factor.

hyaluronidase

(ˌhaɪəlʊˈrɒnɪˌdeɪs; -ˌdeɪz)
n
(Biochemistry) an enzyme that breaks down hyaluronic acid, thus decreasing the viscosity of the medium containing the acid
[C20: hyalo- + Greek ouron urine + -id3 + -ase]

hy•a•lu•ron•i•dase

(ˌhaɪ ə lʊˈrɒn ɪˌdeɪs, -ˌdeɪz)

n.
an enzyme that decreases viscosity in the tissue spaces of the body by breaking down hyaluronic acid: used as an ingredient for diffusing injected drugs.
[1935–40; hyaluron(ic acid) + -id- + -ase]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hyaluronidase - an enzyme (trade name Hyazyme) that splits hyaluronic acid and so lowers its viscosity and increases the permeability of connective tissue and the absorption of fluids
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
References in periodicals archive ?
There are two hyaluronidase options in the United States: Vitrase, an ovine formulation, and Hylenex, a recombinant human formulation.
Vitrase was evaluated in two phase III trials for management of vitreous hemorrhage.
Every drug the compounders supply cuts in to the business of companies like those making Hylenex and Vitrase.
The company added that ISTAa[euro](tm)s four prescription products, Bromday, Bepreve, Istalol, and Vitrase, will complement its existing prescription ophthalmology products, including Lotemax and Besivance, and branded over the counter (OTC) eye vitamins PreserVision and Ocuvite.
47-48) Vitrase is an approved product using an ovine source of hyaluronidase.
Vitrase, on the other hand, is a formulation of hyaluronidase extracted from ovine (ram) testicles.
Separately, an FDA committee said last month that Vitrase, an experimental drug, offers benefits that outweigh risks for treating vitreous hemorrhage, a form of bleeding in the eye that often occurs in diabetes patients.
Shares in the company have slumped worryingly since the announcement this week that the conclusion of the third phase of the clinical trials on the Vitrase drug in the US had been postponed.
Vitrase is an injectable drug designed to induce the clearing of vitreous hemorrhage, or bleeding into the back portion of the eye, in less time than is normally required for clearing to occur on its own so that the ophthalmologist can treat the underlying problem.