vocals


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vo·cal

 (vō′kəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the production of sound through the mouth: the vertebrate vocal organs; a vocal defect.
2. Uttered or produced by the voice: vocal sounds.
3. Full of voices; resounding: a playground vocal with the shouts and laughter of children.
4. Tending to express oneself often or freely; outspoken: a vocal critic of city politics.
5. Linguistics
a. Of or resembling vowels; vocalic.
b. Voiced.
6. Music Of, relating to, or performed by singing: vocal training; vocal music.
n.
1. A vocal sound.
2. often vocals A part or melody that is sung in a musical performance or recording: The drummer does the lead vocal on that song.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vōcālis, from vōx, vōc-, voice; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.]

vo′cal·ly adv.
vo′cal·ness n.
Translations

vocals

[ˈvəʊkəlz] NPLvoz fsing, canto msing
backing vocalscoros mpl
lead vocalsvoz f principal

vocals

[ˈvəʊkəlz] nplchant m
Johnson now sings backing vocals for Mica Paris
BUT Johnson est aujourd'hui choriste pour Mica Parris.
Lead vocals: Boy George. Backing vocals: Helen Terry
BUT Interprète: Boy George. Choriste: Helen Terry.

vocals

[ˈvəʊklz] npl lead vocalsvoce fsg solista
backing vocals → accompagnamento vocale
References in classic literature ?
This vocal organ was in itself a rich endowment, insomuch that a listener, comprehending nothing of the language in which the preacher spoke, might still have been swayed to and fro by the mere tone and cadence.
breaking moreover into a happy laugh which, immediately after, as if it were a vocal accompaniment, he prolonged into incoherent, extravagant song.
Marija felt, so to speak, that she had her hand on the throttle, and the neighborhood was vocal with her rejoicings.
Rochester had sometimes read my unspoken thoughts with an acumen to me incomprehensible: in the present instance he took no notice of my abrupt vocal response; but he smiled at me with a certain smile he had of his own, and which he used but on rare occasions.
She thought that some of them had been laying violent hands on me; and, not daring to attack her master, she turned her vocal artillery against the younger scoundrel.
I am still hoarse with vainly repeated applications of vocal stimulant; and I left her in the railway carriage, to my inexpressible disgust, with both shoes down at heel.
That was a feeble evasion, but Godfrey was not fond of lying, and, not being sufficiently aware that no sort of duplicity can long flourish without the help of vocal falsehoods, he was quite unprepared with invented motives.
It won him a professorship in Boston University; and brought so many pupils around him that he ventured to open an ambitious "School of Vocal Physiology," which became at once a profitable enterprise.
Amongst our lowest orders, the vocal organs are developed to a degree more than correspondent with those of hearing, so that an Isosceles can easily feign the voice of a Polygon, and, with some training, that of a Circle himself.
The youth wondered what had happened to his vocal organs that he no more cursed.
The bird on the branch, the dog in his kennel, the sheep in the field, the boats moored in the Loire, even, became alive and vocal.
His followers are all dancing on the plain, to their own vocal music.