vole

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vole 1

 (vōl)
n.
Any of various rodents of the genus Microtus and related genera, found throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere and having a short muzzle and tail and small ears.

[Short for obsolete volemouse, perhaps from Norwegian *vollmus : Old Norse völlr, field + Old Norse mūs, mouse.]

vole 2

 (vōl)
n. Games
The winning of all the tricks during the play of one hand, as of bridge; a grand slam.

[French, probably from voler, to fly, from Old French, from Latin volāre, to fly.]

vole

(vəʊl)
n
(Animals) any of numerous small rodents of the genus Microtus and related genera, mostly of Eurasia and North America and having a stocky body, short tail, and inconspicuous ears: family Cricetidae. See also water vole
[C19: short for volemouse, from Old Norse vollr field + mus mouse; related to Icelandic vollarmus]

vole

(vəʊl)
n
(Card Games) (in some card games, such as écarté) the taking of all the tricks in a deal, thus scoring extra points
[C17: from French, from voler to fly, from Latin volāre]

vole1

(voʊl)

n.
any of several short-tailed, stocky cricetid rodents, esp. of the genus Microtus.
[1795–1805]

vole2

(voʊl)

n.
[1670–80; < French, derivative of voler to fly]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vole - any of various small mouselike rodents of the family Cricetidae (especially of genus Microtus) having a stout short-tailed body and inconspicuous ears and inhabiting fields or meadowsvole - any of various small mouselike rodents of the family Cricetidae (especially of genus Microtus) having a stout short-tailed body and inconspicuous ears and inhabiting fields or meadows
grasshopper mouse - insectivorous mouse of western North America
wood rat, wood-rat - any of various small short-tailed rodents of the northern hemisphere having soft fur grey above and white below with furred tails and large ears; some are hosts for Ixodes pacificus and Ixodes scapularis (Lyme disease ticks)
pine mouse, pine vole, Pitymys pinetorum - short-tailed glossy-furred burrowing vole of the eastern United States
meadow mouse, meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvaticus - widely distributed in grasslands of northern United States and Canada
Microtus richardsoni, Richardson vole, water vole - of western North America
Microtus ochrogaster, prairie vole - typical vole of the extended prairie region of central United States and southern Canada
Arvicola amphibius, water vole, water rat - common large Eurasian vole
redback vole, red-backed mouse - any of several voles of mountainous regions of Eurasia and America
phenacomys - any of several vole-like terrestrial or arboreal rodents of cold forested regions of Canada and western United States
Translations
myyrä
hörcsögfélék
ハタネズミ畑鼠
sork

vole

[vəʊl] Ncampañol m, ratón m de campo

vole

[ˈvəʊl] ncampagnol m

vole

nWühlmaus f; (= common vole)Feldmaus f

vole

[vəʊl] n field voletopo campagnolo comune
water vole → arvicola
References in periodicals archive ?
THE number of areas where water voles are found across England and Wales has fallen by almost a third in 10 years, a fresh study has revealed.
Figures from a new report out today by The Wildlife Trusts (TWT) reveal the UK has seen a 30% decline in the number of water voles, yet in Wales the work of Gwent Wildlife Trust (GWT) has seen the creatures brought back from local extinction.
Habitat loss, water pollution, built development and predation by mink have led to massive declines in the number of water voles since the 1960s.
Voles are compact rodents with stocky bodies, short legs and short tails and can be mistaken for mice.
Though mice, rats or any other rodent hate alcohol, prairie voles can out drink most of us.
A recent study suggests that common voles (Microtus arvalis) are a key agent for human tularemia in northwestern Spain because of a spatial and temporal coincidence between human tularemia cases and increases in number of voles (5).
HUNDREDS of water voles were set free yesterday to begin the biggest reintroduction of the endangered species in one location in the UK.
The recordings suggest a promising number of water voles have survived the colder months - a period known for its high death rate for the mammal.
Where there may not have been voucher specimens prepared (four localities), a list of those localities with rock voles is archived at MoTTU and in the Natural Heritage database of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
If you prefer, humane traps might also work so that you can release the captured voles far from your garden--just not in your neighbor's garden beds
Moles and their lesser-known co-conspirators, voles, share several characteristics.
A method involving the hand capture of voles through excavation of burrow systems could provide a viable alternative.