Volsci


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Vol·sci

 (vôl′skē, vŏl′sī, -sē, -shē)
pl.n.
A people of ancient Italy whose territory was conquered by the Romans in the fourth century bc.

Volsci

(ˈvɒlskiː)
pl n
1. (Peoples) a warlike people of ancient Latium, subdued by Rome in the fifth and fourth centuries bc
2. (Historical Terms) a warlike people of ancient Latium, subdued by Rome in the fifth and fourth centuries bc

Vol•sci

(ˈvɒl saɪ, -si, -ʃi)

n.pl.
an Italic people of Latium and Campania, subjugated by Rome in the 4th century b.c.
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References in periodicals archive ?
DEI COMUNI DI LENOLA, ROCCASECCA DEI VOLSCI, VALLECORSA, PICO, SAN FELICE CIRCEO, PONZA
for the Latins felt that, without the co-operation of Roman power; it would be difficult for them to either the constant pressure of the Volsci and Aequi from the mountains or the standing danger of a new Etruscan conquest.
34) A good illustration of the horror on the battleground is given by Livy in a passage concerning a surprise attack of the Volsci on the Romans in 431 BC:
Salentine juni or Castro dei Volsci ine and tune, the emphatic variants, respectively, of i and tu; to personal pronouns of the third person, cf.
The first case, dated to 431 BCE, involved the dictator Aulus Postumius Tubertus on campaign against the Aequi and Volsci.
Coriolanus was also good, portraying the battles between the Romans and the Volsci as fighting between an official government and a group of terrorists.
La parte del movimiento que expreso la mayor tasa de conflictividad fue, en cambio, el area de la Autonomia Operaia, formada por los colectivos--independientes--de las distintas ciudades (Collettivi politici veneti per il potere operaio en Padua, Collettivo di via dei Volsci en Roma, Rosso en Milan) y volcada en una elevacion del nivel del enfrentamiento que provoco un ulterior tributo de sangre y la violenta y a veces criminal respuesta policial.
In the literary record of the events following the successful confrontation of Coriolanus and the Volsci in 488, when Roman matronae requested permission from the Senate to establish a temple to Fortuna Muliebris, the compromise reached reflects a scenario' in which women had earned sufficient respect to entitle them to negotiate with Roman civic power on a religious issue.