Volstead


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Related to Volstead: Volstead Act

Vol•stead

(ˈvɒl stɛd, ˈvoʊl-)

n.
Andrew Joseph, 1860–1946, U.S. legislator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bronfman family expanded their liquor business by supplying the US market after the Volstead Act shut down the (legal) industry there.
The crumbling of the unpopular Volstead Act accelerated on this date in 1933 when Congress amended the act to permit beer of 3.
Officially it was the Eighteenth Amendment, or the Volstead Act.
After passage of the Volstead Act, (17) however, the AMA asserted that alcohol could be used to treat 27 different conditions and ailments.
13 The Volstead Act led to which period of American history?
Peterson tells me that two exceptions in the Volstead Act allowed many Zinfandel vineyards to survive Prohibition: One sanctioned sacramental wine; the other permitted individual home winemakers to produce an astonishing 200 gallons a year, the equivalent of a thousand 750-ml.
There's heavy metal at Red 7, hip-hop at Mohawk, dance at the Volstead Lounge - whatever you want, it's here, seven nights a week.
The Volstead Act came at a time when the federal government enforced very few criminal laws.
92) Homemade wine, for personal consumption, had always been exempt from federal taxation and was permitted throughout Prohibition by an exemption for fermented "cider and fruit juices" in the Volstead Act.
Thanks to a provision in 1919's Volstead Act, wineries were allowed to produce and ship grapes and wine for sacramental or medicinal purposes.
The book ends by discussing the leadup to the Prohibition movement, the 18th Amendment, and the Volstead Act which began restricting opium.
XXI, and the Volstead Act (also known as the National Prohibition Act and as the Act of Oct.