Volsunga Saga


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Volsunga Saga

(ˈvɒlsʊŋɡə)
n
(Norse Myth & Legend) a 13th-century Icelandic saga about the family of the Volsungs and the deeds of Sigurd, related in theme and story to the Nibelungenlied
References in periodicals archive ?
I will also be looking at medieval and renaissance parallels in Beowulf and the Volsunga Saga and Book I of Spenser's Fairie Queene, as possible sources for the largely comic treatment of dragons in the works I am considering.
In this gory, gripping reworking of the Icelandic Volsunga Saga, set in a future world where genetic engineering has blurred the lines between men, beasts, and machines, 15-year-old Sigurd is the last surviving member of the Volson clan.
A companion volume to the 1995 Women in Old Norse Society, Old Norse Images of Women analyses the representations of women found in Old Norse mythological writing: primarily the Poetic and Snorra Eddas, and Volsunga saga.
Edda; Volsunga Saga are the sources throughout this section.
This is a grim and brutal British fantasy, based on the first part of the Icelandic Volsunga Saga.
The distinction Tolkien draws between Aragorn's role as king and warrior is best examined through a comparison with a source text Tolkien was familiar with: The Volsunga Saga.
Following the text notes, in his short essay on ravens, Rateliff does mention Odin's ravens, Hugin and Munin, as well as the traditions of the Volsunga Saga and the Fafnismal, but he might also have mentioned the Krakumal ("The Lay of the Raven"), contained in the same codex as the Volsunga Saga.