Vonnegut


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Von·ne·gut

 (vŏn′ĭ-gət), Kurt, Jr. 1922-2007.
American writer whose works show compassion and humor in the midst of the violence and alienation of modern life. His novels include Cat's Cradle (1963) and Slaughterhouse-Five (1969).

Vonnegut

(ˈvɒnɪɡʌt)
n
(Biography) Kurt. 1922–2007, US novelist. His works include Cat's Cradle (1963), Slaughterhouse Five (1969), Galapagos (1985), Hocus Pocus (1990), and Timequake (1997)
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Noun1.Vonnegut - United States writer whose novels and short stories are a mixture of realism and satire and science fiction (born in 1922)
References in periodicals archive ?
movement reaching from Barth to Vonnegut (with historiographic
Ellison, for example, could just as comfortably have been partnered with Pynchon, Heller, and Vonnegut.
Kurt Vonnegut is fond of saying "be careful what you wish for because you might get it.
And in a promotion letter we recently received from The Washington Spectator, Kurt Vonnegut writes:
There are also many which are new, at least to this reviewer, including Larry Heinemann, Bao Ninh, Kurt Vonnegut and Shusaku Endo.
Our start in science fiction was through writers like Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut.
While Kurt Vonnegut does supply a few tremors of amusement in this hodgepodge of fact and fiction - the supposed remnants of and musings over a long, bad novel he decided not to publish - the overall impression is one of tired familiarity.
In the late fall of 1996, Greenwood Press released The Vonnegut Chronicles, its third scholarly contribution to Vonnegut studies in the past three years.
Let me see if I've got this straight: In response to Jonathan Franzen's meditation on the state of the American novel ["Perchance to Dream," April], Kurt Vonnegut argues [Letters, July] that writing is therapy.
Cat's Cradle Science-fiction novel by KURT VONNEGUT, Jr.
Leonard Mustazza's enthusiastic account of all Vonnegut's major novels, up to but not including the most recent Hocus Pocus (1990), challenges the critical view of Vonnegut as morally indifferent and argues that the source of discontent in the novels rests with humanity rather than a tyrannical, unjust, or even indifferent God.
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut (1969) I became a fan of Kurt Vonnegut after reading this surreal and horrifying book.