voter

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Related to Voters: voting

vot·er

 (vō′tər)
n.
1. One who votes.
2. One who has the right to vote: Only half of the voters participated in the election.

voter

(ˈvəʊtə)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who can or does vote

vot•er

(ˈvoʊ tər)

n.
1. a person who votes.
2. a person who has a right to vote; elector.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.voter - a citizen who has a legal right to votevoter - a citizen who has a legal right to vote
electorate - the body of enfranchised citizens; those qualified to vote
constituent - a member of a constituency; a citizen who is represented in a government by officials for whom he or she votes; "needs continued support by constituents to be re-elected"
citizen - a native or naturalized member of a state or other political community
crossover voter, crossover - a voter who is registered as a member of one political party but who votes in the primary of another party
floater - a voter who votes illegally at different polling places in the same election
floating voter, swing voter - a voter who has no allegiance to any political party and whose unpredictable decisions can swing the outcome of an election one way or the other

voter

noun
One who votes:
Translations
ناخِب، مُصَوِّت
volič-ka
vælger
äänestäjä
szavazó
kjósandi
volivec
väljare

voter

[ˈvəʊtəʳ] N (gen) → votante mf; (in election) → elector(a) m/f

voter

[ˈvəʊtər] nélecteur/trice m/fvote-winner [ˈvəʊtwɪnər] natout m électoral

voter

nWähler(in) m(f)

voter

[ˈvəʊtəʳ] nelettore/trice

vote

(vəut) noun
(the right to show) one's wish or opinion, eg in a ballot or by raising a hand etc, especially at an election or in a debate. In Britain, the vote was given to women over twenty-one in 1928; Nowadays everyone over eighteen has a vote; A vote was taken to decide the matter.
verb
1. to cast or record one's vote. She voted for the Conservative candidate; I always vote Labour; I shall vote against the restoration of capital punishment.
2. to allow, by a vote, the provision of (something) eg to someone, for a purpose etc. They were voted $5,000 to help them in their research.
ˈvoter noun
a person who votes or has the right to vote.
vote of confidence
a vote taken to establish whether the government or other authority still has the majority's support for its policies.
vote of thanks
an invitation, usually in the form of a short speech, to an audience etc to show gratitude to a speaker etc by applauding etc. Mrs Smith proposed a vote of thanks to the organizers of the concert.
References in classic literature ?
I should not like to have it pasted over with their great bills, and as to making Jack and Captain race about to the public-houses to bring up half-drunken voters, why, I think 'twould be an insult to the horses.
Fizkin's people have got three-and-thirty voters in the lock-up coach-house at the White Hart.
In the last State the members of Assembly for the cities and counties of New York and Albany are elected by very nearly as many voters as will be entitled to a representative in the Congress, calculating on the number of sixty-five representatives only.
It was a band of voters coming to the rescue of their allies, and taking the Camerfield forces in flank.
You must always bear in mind, in such cases as this, where our interests are not affected,' said Mr Gregsbury, 'to put it very strong about the people, because it comes out very well at election- time; and you could be as funny as you liked about the authors; because I believe the greater part of them live in lodgings, and are not voters.
That and outside work among the voters will, to a certainty.
He then desired to know, "What arts were practised in electing those whom I called commoners: whether a stranger, with a strong purse, might not influence the vulgar voters to choose him before their own landlord, or the most considerable gentleman in the neighbourhood?
It has become so truly an organ of the social body that by telephone we now enter into contracts, give evidence, try lawsuits, make speeches, propose marriage, confer degrees, appeal to voters, and do almost everything else that is a matter of speech.
He had no seat in Parliament himself, but he was extremely patriotic, and usually drove his voters up to the poll with his own hands.
I shall tell everybody that you are going to put up for Middlemarch on the Whig side when old Pinkerton resigns, and that Casaubon is going to help you in an underhand manner: going to bribe the voters with pamphlets, and throw open the public-houses to distribute them.
There are no estates to manage, no rents to return so much per cent upon in bad times (which is an extremely dear way of getting your name into the newspapers), no voters to become parboiled in hot water with, no agents to take the cream off the milk before it comes to table.
For instance, just now it was election time again--within five or six weeks the voters of the country would select a President; and he heard the wretches with whom he associated discussing it, and saw the streets of the city decorated with placards and banners--and what words could describe the pangs of grief and despair that shot through him?