votive

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Related to Votive deposit: Votive Objects

vo·tive

 (vō′tĭv)
adj.
1. Given or dedicated in fulfillment of a vow or pledge: a votive offering.
2. Expressing or symbolizing a wish, desire, or vow: a votive prayer; votive candles.

[Latin vōtīvus, from vōtum, vow; see vote.]

vo′tive·ly adv.

votive

(ˈvəʊtɪv)
adj
1. offered, given, undertaken, performed, or dedicated in fulfilment of or in accordance with a vow
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church optional; not prescribed; having the nature of a voluntary offering: a votive Mass; a votive candle.
[C16: from Latin vōtīvus promised by a vow, from vōtum a vow]
ˈvotively adv
ˈvotiveness n

vo•tive

(ˈvoʊ tɪv)

adj.
1. offered, dedicated, performed, etc., in accordance with a vow, often as an act of veneration or of gratitude for a favor granted: a votive offering.
2. of the nature of or expressive of a wish or desire.
[1585–95; < Latin vōtīvus=vōt(um) a vow + -īvus -ive]
vo′tive•ly, adv.
vo′tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.votive - dedicated in fulfillment of a vow; "votive prayers"
consecrate, consecrated, dedicated - solemnly dedicated to or set apart for a high purpose; "a life consecrated to science"; "the consecrated chapel"; "a chapel dedicated to the dead of World War II"
Translations

votive

[ˈvəʊtɪv] ADJvotivo
votive offeringofrenda f votiva, exvoto m

votive

[ˈvəʊtɪv] adjvotif/ivevotive candle n (in church)cierge m; (decorative)bougie f décorative

votive

adjVotiv-; votive candleVotivkerze f; votive paintingVotivbild nt

votive

[ˈvəʊtɪv] adj (offering) → votivo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Standing male and female nudes, detailed representations of the internal organs of the body and truncated figures with the abdominal cavity opened to display the internal organs sometimes are found in the votive deposits as well.
Since terracotta heads are found in the same votive deposits as the anatomical examples, it is commonly accepted that they also paid tribute to successful cures.
It turns to evidence not only from the literary record, but epigraphical sources and votive deposits.