Vulgar Latin


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Related to Vulgar Latin: Romantic Languages

Vulgar Latin

n.
The common speech of the ancient Romans, which is distinguished from standard literary Latin and is the ancestor of the Romance languages.

Vulgar Latin

n
1. (Languages) any of the dialects of Latin spoken in the Roman Empire other than classical Latin. The Romance languages developed from them
2. (Historical Terms) any of the dialects of Latin spoken in the Roman Empire other than classical Latin. The Romance languages developed from them

Vul′gar Lat′in


n.
popular Latin, as distinguished from literary or standard Latin, esp. those spoken forms of Latin from which the Romance languages developed. Abbr.: VL
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vulgar Latin - nonclassical Latin dialects spoken in the Roman Empire; source of Romance languages
Low Latin - any dialect of Latin other than the classical
Translations
Vulgärlateinisch
latin vulgaire

Vulgar Latin

nVulgärlatein nt

vulgar Latin

nlatino volgare
References in periodicals archive ?
Coexisting with this was a variety of dialects that existed only in spoken form--the Latin of the people--collectively known as Vulgar Latin.
The e-o vowel alternations are partly based on direct Vulgar Latin influences, on various Iberian dialectal choices, on neighboring languages reflections, on literal considerations, and on places of settlements.
Romance linguists have scientifically shown that the group of languages we refer to as Italian dialects includes Italian, and that like Italian (and like the other Romance languages) they evolved from Vulgar Latin.
This may be a fusion of the foreshortening of the Middle French 'destresse', and Old French estrece "narrowness, oppression", in turn derived from Vulgar Latin *strictia, from L.
The authors have chosen to use the most common definition: "[a] dialect is a 'variant' of a language" and point out that the Romance languages (French, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Friulian, Sardinian, Romansh, and a few others) "turn out, in effect, to be modern-day 'variants' of Vulgar Latin (VL)" (11).
Spanish is a Romance language; it emerged from Vulgar Latin dialects in the north of the peninsula.
From this spoken language he naturally charts the development of the Romance languages in Part II as logical, arguably inevitable, consequences of Vulgar Latin.