Vulpes


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Related to Vulpes: genus Vulpes, foxes, Canidae, Vulpes zerda
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vulpes - foxesVulpes - foxes          
mammal genus - a genus of mammals
Canidae, family Canidae - dogs; wolves; jackals; foxes
Vulpes vulpes, red fox - the common Old World fox; having reddish-brown fur; commonly considered a single circumpolar species
Vulpes fulva, red fox - New World fox; often considered the same species as the Old World fox
prairie fox, Vulpes velox, kit fox - small grey fox of the plains of western North America
kit fox, Vulpes macrotis - small grey fox of southwestern United States; may be a subspecies of Vulpes velox
References in periodicals archive ?
Vulpes vulpes is the scientific name for which animal?
ABSTRACT--The Rocky Mountain Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes macroura), once common in the Blue Mountains ecoregion of northeastern Oregon, was considered rare in eastern Oregon by the 1930s and thought to be extirpated by the 1960s, when putatively new Red Fox populations began to appear.
The red fox Vulpes vulpes (n = 471 photos), rarely occurs in close habitats in summer where wildcats usually occur.
Sexual dimorphism of cranial measurements in the red fox Vulpes vulpes (Canidae, Carnivora) from Czech Republic.
The ecology of red foxes, Vulpes vulpes, in metropolitan Toronto, Ontario: disease management implications.
An analysis using Bristol's red foxes Vulpes vulpes as an example.
Interspecific competition and the geographical distribution of red and Arctic foxes Vulpes vulpes and Alopex lagopus.
It is home to several globally threatened species of birds and mammals, such as Syrian Serin Serinus syriacus, Lesser Kestrel Falco naumanni, Blanford's Fox Vulpes cana and Nubian Ibex Capra nubiana.
2006) and a negative effect on both the conception rate and mean litter size was observed with decreasing frozen silver fox (Vulpes vulpes ) sperm numbers in blue fox vixens (Farstad et al.
The study identifies a newly discovered 3 to 5-million-year-old Tibetan fox from the Himalayan Mountains, Vulpes qiuzhudingi, as the likely ancestor of the living Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus), lending support to the idea that the evolution of present-day animals of the Arctic region is intimately connected to ancestors that first became adapted for life in cold regions in the high altitude environments of the Tibetan Plateau.
Numbers and distribution of several predator species in Scotland, including both pine marten Martes martes and red fox Vulpes vulpes, declined during the 19th and early 20th centuries.
meles and the coyote Canis latrans, followed by the red fox Vulpes vulpes, and the river otter Lutra lutra, the lion Panthera leo, the wolf Canis lupus, the leopard Panthera pardus, and the puma (Table 3).