WAAAF


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WAAAF

(formerly) abbreviation for
(Military) Women's Auxiliary Australian Air Force
References in periodicals archive ?
She carried small note books and made sketches of WAAAF and RAAF personnel at times when there was a lot of waiting to be done.
Two of Elsa's colleagues, Gai Bartley (nee Fairbairn) and Pearl Batchelor, who served with her in her first years of the WAAAF, have no recollection of her painting.
All three found the experience of being in the WAAAF broadening.
Besides bad language all three women did indeed find the WAAAF to be rough.
Pearl and Gai, as well as another colleague at Laverton, attest to Elsa's lively attitude to WAAAF service.
She also used some of this material in her much later WAAAF Book.
8 While women of the WAAAF do not have any presence in the public and official articulation of the Anzac legend, the similarities in the testimony of the women I interviewed suggested that they too adhere to a common narrative--one of the experience of independence, camaraderie and an absence of prejudice against women, which restrained them after they left the WAAAF.
9) Experiences of the WAAAF were extremely important to the women I interviewed.
12) For the three women, it seemed to reinforce the specialness of having served with the WAAAF.
However, none of them were willing to appear unabashedly proud, as they did not want the part they played in the war effort to be seen as anything special with respect to the contribution of other WAAAF women.
23) This strong statement shows a belief that, although WAAAF members were treated differently, they were actually treated with reverence rather than disrespect.
Whether that was the case or not, this view seems to have become embedded in the collective narrative of the WAAAF.