wages council

(redirected from Wage Councils)
Also found in: Financial.

wages council

n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) (formerly, in Britain) a statutory body empowered to fix minimum wages in an industry; abolished in 1994
References in periodicals archive ?
A Smith administration would ban zero hours contracts, introduce wage councils for hotel, shop and care workers, ramp up NHS spending, introduce a new wealth tax and invest billions in infrastructure.
He has also come forward with plans for the return of wage councils, a new wealth tax and a 4% increase in NHS spending.
He would introduce new wage councils for hotel, shop and care workers, to strengthen terms and conditions.
This should include stronger collective bargaining rights, modern wage councils to ensure that pay increases follow productivity gains and worker representation on remuneration committees to bring back a bit of reality to boardroom pay.
Based on data at the directorate general of industrial relation development and workers social security, only 14 of the country's 34 provinces have announced UMP, whereas all provincial wage councils already submitted wage recommendations to the governors.
7d a week, which was protected by the Wage Councils - the same Wage Councils the Tories abolished in 1993.
The current law defines two types of minimum wages: (1) regional minimum wages based on collective agreement, and (2) minimum wages based on the studies and deliberations of minimum wage councils.
Since the demise of wage councils we have continued to have a minimum wage in this county.
Wage Councils - which set occupational minimum wages and work conditions - were largely abolished, welfare benefits reduced in relative terms and eligibility tightened.
The book refers to recent British work on the abolition of wage councils that yields SR results consistent with those in this book: no adverse change in employment (Machin and Manning 1994).
The pay for higher proportions of part-timers was determined by wage councils awards.
He also called for the creation of wage councils to cover more than nine million workers in hospitality, retail and social care.