Wagon jack

Wagon jack

A Jack intended for raising a wagon axle two or three inches so that a wheel could be removed or partially pulled off for greasing. When a light farm wagon was empty, greasing was generally done by manually lifting one corner of the wagon, sliding the wheel partially off the iron skein, and putting grease only on the exposed section. Later, after the wheel was reinstalled and began rotating, the grease would work its way over the whole wheel bearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
1975) describes a factory-made "timber jack" built in Germany in 1677 that is similar to the historical society's Conestoga wagon jack.
Collector Stan Wolf, featured in an article beginning on page 22, counts among his favorite treasures a wagon jack built 150 years ago for his grandfather by a local blacksmith.
Perhaps our era of plenty helps us more fully appreciate the workmanship evident in a 150-year-old wagon jack, or the resourcefulness of a farmer who found a way to feed his livestock during the Depression.
One of the oldest pieces in the collection is a screw-type wagon jack that dates to about 1820.
Many carpenters and planing mills began to fabricate buggy and wagon jacks for commercial distribution.