waiver

(redirected from Waivers)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Waivers: wavers

waiv·er

 (wā′vər)
n.
1.
a. Intentional relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege.
b. The document that evidences such relinquishment.
2. A dispensation, as from a rule or penalty.
3. Permission for a professional athletic club to assign a player to the minor leagues or release a player from the club, granted only after all other clubs have been given the opportunity to claim the player and have not done so.
4. A deferment.
tr.v. wai·vered, wai·ver·ing, wai·vers
To provide with a waiver or issue a waiver for.
Idioms:
clear waivers
To be unclaimed by another professional club and therefore liable to be assigned to a minor-league club or released.
on waivers
In a state of being available for claiming by other professional clubs.

[Anglo-Norman weyver, from weyver, to abandon; see waive.]

waiver

(ˈweɪvə)
n
1. (Law) the voluntary relinquishment, expressly or by implication, of some claim or right
2. (Law) the act or an instance of relinquishing a claim or right
3. (Law) a formal statement in writing of such relinquishment
[C17: from Old Northern French weyver to relinquish, waive]

waiv•er

(ˈweɪ vər)

n.
1. the intentional relinquishment of a right.
2. an express or written statement specifying this.
[1620–30; < Anglo-French weyver, n. use of infinitive: to waive; see -er3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waiver - a formal written statement of relinquishment
relinquishing, relinquishment - the act of giving up and abandoning a struggle or task etc.
granting immunity, exemption, immunity - an act exempting someone; "he was granted immunity from prosecution"

waiver

waiver

noun
1. A giving up of a possession, claim, or right:
2. The act of putting off or the condition of being put off:
Translations
zrzeczenie się

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] N
1. (= renouncement) [of right, claim, fee] → renuncia f
2. (= exoneration) (from payment) → exoneración f
3. (= suspension) [of regulation, condition, restriction] → exención f
4. (= disclaimer) [of responsibility] → descargo m

waiver

[ˈweɪvər] ndispense f

waiver

n (Jur) → Verzicht m (→ of auf +acc); (= document)Verzichterklärung f; (of law, contract, clause)Außerkraftsetzung f

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] nrinuncia
References in periodicals archive ?
Immigration waivers are becoming more widely utilized by more individuals in order to help them avoid certain penalties and remain in the U.
May 20, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Mentor Graphics Corporation (NASDAQ: MENT) today announced that specialty foundry TowerJazz has adopted the Calibre Auto-Waivers(TM) product to manage foundry design rule waivers associated with embedded IP in its customers' designs.
Department of Education would grant states waivers from particular provisions in the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law.
Because the services require waivers for these recruits, we can track them over time.
Casey hosted five meetings across the country, bringing together key administration officials, state and local child welfare leaders, and experts on IV-E waivers and IV-E financing.
Since that time, I have embarked on a crusade to get the word out about the Medicaid Waivers that are available in every state for individuals with mental retardation and developmental disabilities.
Arnold Schwarzenegger remains committed to the federal waivers for Los Angeles and Alameda counties.
In 1996, GAO reported that J-1 visa waivers had become a major source of physicians for underserved areas but were not well coordinated with Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) programs for addressing physician shortages.
gov) information on the general areas in which waivers from the mandatory e-filing requirements will be granted.
the Legislature to enact legislation expressly authorizing pre-dispute jury waivers.
SUBJECT: Policy Memo 05-3, "Elimination of Waivers to Cite Military Specifications and Standards in Solicitations and Contracts"