Walach


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Walach

(ˈwɑːlɒk)
n, adj
1. (Peoples) a variant spelling of Vlach
2. (Languages) a variant spelling of Vlach
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References in periodicals archive ?
The complex nature of symptoms and standard treatments for individuals receiving HD could benefit from a theoretical framework based on the complementary therapy being studied (Lewith, Walach, & Jonas, 2012).
Zenner, Herrnleben-Kurz, and Walach (2014) systematically reviewed the research evidence regarding the effects of school-based mindfulness interventions on student-participants' psychological outcomes and identified 24 studies throughout grades 1-12; 13 of which were published.
2014), and endorse spirituality as personally valuable (Kohls & Walach, 2006).
En sintesis, las IBM estan mostrado su eficacia en contextos clinicos (Grossman, Niemann, Schmidt, & Walach, 2004; Korman & Garay, 2012) y academicos (Mapel, 2012; Langer et al.
Also, in recent years many schools have begun to encourage mindfulness and meditation practices, which have been found to help students reduce stress levels and improve cognitive performance (Zenner, Herrnleben-Kurz, & Walach, 2014).
Tressoldi & IJtts, 2012), distant intentionality and the feeling of being stared at (Schmidt, Schneider, Utts & Walach, 2004), and "feeling the future" via implicit precognition studies (Bem, Tressoldi, Rabeyron, & Duggan, 2016) all suggest that effects can be much more robust and consistent than is portrayed here, giving cumulative outcomes that differ from chance expectation to a highly significant degree (I discuss replication in more detail in Roe, 2016a).
2000), chronic pain (Grossman, Tiefenthaler-Gilmer, Raysz, & Kesper, 2007), enhance overall health as well as quality of life (Grossman, Niemann, Schmidt, & Walach, 2004).
Desde entonces, han sido publicados numerosos estudios con resultados positivos para poblaciones diversas y condiciones diferentes, tanto clinicas como no clinicas (por ejemplo, Bohlmeijer, Prenger, Taal & Cuijpers, 2010; Chiesa & Serreti, 2009; Grossman, Niemann, Schmidt & Walach, 2004).
MBIs have been used to improve quality of life in patients with many medical conditions, including fibromyalgia, heart disease, and cancer (Grossman, Niemann, Schmidt, & Walach, 2004).
A large body of empirical literature has associated mindfulness practice with positive psychological outcomes and other health benefits (Eberth & Sedlmeier, 2012; Grossman, Niemann, Schmidt, & Walach, 2004), although the precise mechanism by which this happens still remains to be explored.
Among the currently available and most reliable mindfulness questionnaires one can identify the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS [see Brown & Ryan, 2003]), the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI [see Buchheld, Grossman, & Walach, 2001]), the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills (KIMS [Baer, Smith, & Allen, 2004]), the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale (CAMS [Feldman, Hayes, Kumar, & Greeson, 2004; Hayes & Feldman, 2004]) and the Mindfulness Questionnaire (MQ; Chadwick, Hember, Mead, Lilley, & Dagnan, 2005).