Wales


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Wales

 (wālz)
A principality of the United Kingdom west of England on the island of Great Britain. Incorporated with England since the Act of Union (1536), Wales has maintained its own distinct culture and a strong nationalist sentiment. Cardiff is the capital and the largest city.
Word History: Although Celtic-speaking peoples were living in Britain long before the arrival of the invaders from Friesland and Jutland whose languages would eventually develop into English, it was the Celts and not the invaders who came to be called "strangers" in Old English. The English words for the descendants of one of these Celtic peoples, Welsh, and for their homeland, Wales, come from the Old English word wealh, meaning "foreigner, stranger, Celt." Its plural wealas is the direct ancestor of Wales, literally "foreigners, Celts." An Old English adjective derived from wealh, wælisc or welisc, is the source of our Welsh. The Germanic form for the root from which wealh descended was *walh-, "foreign." A form of *walh- can also be seen in a word attested once in the surviving manuscripts of Old English, the compound walhhnutu found in a document from around 1050. This word eventually became Middle English walnotte and Modern English walnut, which is thus literally the "foreign nut." The English walnut is native to Asia (and perhaps also to some parts of Eastern Europe), and the cultivation of the tree is a relatively new practice in Europe. The Roman author Pliny the Elder, for example, says that the ancient Greeks received their first walnut trees from the Persians. Eventually, the walnut came to be cultivated extensively in western Europe by the Romans and Gauls, and the ancient Germanic peoples knew walnuts primarily as a product of Roman Gaul and later medieval France. In the Germanic languages, the walnut eventually came to be named with words made up of the reflex of Germanic *walh-, "foreigner, Celt" added to the Germanic word for "nut,"—as in Old Norse valhnot, Middle Dutch walnote, and Old English walhhnutu.

Wales

(weɪlz)
n
(Placename) a principality that is part of the United Kingdom, in the west of Great Britain; conquered by the English in 1282; parliamentary union with England took place in 1536: a separate Welsh Assembly with limited powers was established in 1999. Wales consists mainly of moorlands and mountains and has an economy that is chiefly agricultural, with an industrial and former coal-mining area in the south. Capital: Cardiff. Pop: 3 063 456 (2011 est). Area: 20 768 sq km (8017 sq miles). Welsh name: Cymru Medieval Latin name: Cambria

Wales

(weɪlz)
n
(Biography) Jimmy (Donal). born 1966, US internet entrepreneur and educator; co-founder (2001) of the open-source online encyclopedia Wikipedia

Wales

(weɪlz)

n.
a division of the United Kingdom, in SW Great Britain. 2,886,400; 8018 sq. mi. (20,768 sq. km). Medieval, Cambria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Wales - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandWales - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; during Roman times the region was known as Cambria
Sealyham terrier, Sealyham - a wire-haired terrier with short legs that was first bred in Sealyham
Annwfn, Annwn - (Welsh mythology) the other world; land of fairies
Cymric, Welsh - a Celtic language of Wales
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Aberdare - a mining town in southern Wales
Bangor - a university town in northwestern Wales on the Menai Strait
Cardiff - the capital and largest city of Wales
Newport - a port city in southeastern Wales
Sealyham - a village in southwestern Wales where the Sealyham terrier was first bred
Swansea - a port city in southern Wales on an inlet of the Bristol Channel
Anglesea, Anglesea Island, Anglesey, Anglesey Island, Mona - an island to the northwest of Wales
Menai Strait - a strait in northern Wales between Anglesey Island and the mainland
River Severn, Severn, Severn River - a river in England and Wales flowing into the Bristol Channel; the longest river in Great Britain
Amaethon - the farmer god; ancient god of agriculture
Arawn - Celtic deity who was the lord of Annwfn (the other world or the land of fairies)
Arianrhod, Arianrod - Celtic goddess famous for her beauty; mother of Dylan
Don - Celtic goddess; mother of Gwydion and Arianrhod; corresponds to Irish Danu
Dylan - Celtic god of the waves; son of Arianrhod
Gwyn - Celtic underworld god
Llew Llaw Gyffes - son of Gwydion and Arianrhod; supported by magic of Gwydion; cursed by Arianrhod
LLud - a Celtic warrior god
Llyr - Celtic deity who was the father of Manawydan; corresponds to Irish Lir
Manawydan, Manawyddan - Celtic sea god; son of Llyr
Cymry, Welsh, Welshman, Cambrian - a native or resident of Wales

Wales

noun Cymru (Welsh), Cambria (Latin) the Secretary of State for Wales
Translations
Wales
Wales
Wales
Wales
Wales
ウェールズ
웨일스
Wales
Wales
Уельс
xứ Wales

Wales

[weɪlz] N(el país de) Gales m

Wales

[ˈweɪlz] npays m de Galles
in Wales → au pays de Galles
to Wales → au pays de Galles
I'm from Wales → je suis gallois
the Prince of Wales → le prince de Galles

Wales

nWales nt; Prince/Princess of WalesPrinz m/Prinzessin fvon Wales

Wales

[weɪlz] nGalles m

Wales

وَيْلز Wales Wales Wales Ουαλία Gales Wales Pays de Galles Wales Galles ウェールズ 웨일스 Wales Wales Walia País de Gales Уэльс Wales แคว้นเวลส์ที่รวมอยู่ในสหราชอาณาจักรอังกฤษ Galler xứ Wales 威尔士
References in classic literature ?
When I had reached my eighteenth Year I was recalled by my Parents to my paternal roof in Wales.
And, although these were all written in Welsh, it has been thought that some may have been brought to Wales from France.
Later still, when the Saxons came, the Britons were driven by degrees into the mountains of Wales and the wilds of Cornwall, while others fled again across the sea to Brittany.
And whether they first heard them in Armorica or in wild Wales, the Norman minstrels took the old Welsh stories and made them their own.
You can't have verbal communication with a man in New South Wales, you know.
And Magwitch - in New South Wales - having at last disclosed himself," said Mr.
I communicated to Magwitch - in New South Wales - when he first wrote to me - from New South Wales - the caution that he must not expect me ever to deviate from the strict line of fact.
Let England have its navigation and fleet -- let Scotland have its navigation and fleet -- let Wales have its navigation and fleet -- let Ireland have its navigation and fleet -- let those four of the constituent parts of the British empire be be under four independent governments, and it is easy to perceive how soon they would each dwindle into comparative insignificance.
Crickgelly, North Wales, was assuredly a very remote place to banish her to; but then the doctor was not a man to do things by halves: he knew the lengths to which my cunning and resolution were capable of carrying me; and he would have been innocent indeed if he had hidden his daughter from me in any place within reasonable distance of Barkingham.
However, I managed to mention my modest wishes to be conveyed at once in the direction of Wales, with no more than a becoming confusion of manner.
The extreme uniformity of the vegetation is the most remarkable feature in the landscape of the greater part of New South Wales.
The Blackheath is a very comfortable inn, kept by an old soldier; and it reminded me of the small inns in North Wales.