War Office


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War Office

(formerly) n
(Military)
a. the department of state responsible for the British Army, now part of the Ministry of Defence
b. the premises of this department in Whitehall, London
References in classic literature ?
Whisper a word at the War Office that perhaps it would be as well--just for a week, say--to test a few of my reports, and they'd laugh at you with the air of superior beings listening to the chatter of a fool.
Bennet was restored to her usual querulous serenity; and, by the middle of June, Kitty was so much recovered as to be able to enter Meryton without tears; an event of such happy promise as to make Elizabeth hope that by the following Christmas she might be so tolerably reasonable as not to mention an officer above once a day, unless, by some cruel and malicious arrangement at the War Office, another regiment should be quartered in Meryton.
Tell the man the formula for powder is in grey envelope in first drawer to the left of Secretary's desk, War Office, in red ink.
By favour of Hirsch and the authorities, the Duke and I have actually been allowed to inspect the secret drawer at the War Office where the Hirsch formula is kept.
She has made me promise to take her to you for a long visit when the War Office retires me.
Your country loves you, sir; his Majesty King George the Third loves you; your memory is honoured, revered, respected; everybody's fond of you, and grateful to you; your name's wrote down at full length in a book in the War Office.
You bet--our War Office isn't going to be caught-napping this time.
He begged his way to Paris, and while there made application at the War Office, not for the thousand francs of extra pension which had been promised to him, nor yet for the Cross of the Legion of Honor, but only for the bare pension due to him after twenty-two years of service, and I do not know how many campaigns.
I myself had been given a job at the War Office, so was able to see them continually.
Landlady Zaidia Naif says: "Tourists, especially Americans, are fascinated by The War Office.
The engineer, in due course, reported thereon to the War Office, and, after consideration of the report, the War Office authorities were convinced of the feasibility of extracting toulol from coal gas on a large scale throughout the country, and an arrangement was come with the Birmingham Corporation Gas Department whereby the first series of toulol extraction plants was installed at the Nechells Gas Works.
It was accompanied by a letter from the war office dated November 9 1944, telling the soldier's family of his death.