ward

(redirected from Ward of court)
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ward

 (wôrd)
n.
1.
a. A room in a hospital usually holding six or more patients.
b. A division in a hospital for the care of a particular group of patients: a maternity ward.
2.
a. A division of a city or town, especially an electoral district, for administrative and representative purposes.
b. A district of some English and Scottish counties corresponding roughly to the hundred or the wapentake.
3. One of the divisions of a penal institution, such as a prison.
4. An open court or area of a castle or fortification enclosed by walls.
5.
a. Law A minor or a person deemed legally incompetent.
b. A person under the protection or care of another.
6. Archaic
a. The act of guarding or protecting; guardianship.
b. The act of keeping watch or being a lookout.
c. The state of being under guard; custody.
7. A defensive movement or attitude, especially in fencing; a guard.
8.
a. The projecting ridge of a lock or keyhole that prevents the turning of a key other than the proper one.
b. The notch cut into a key that corresponds to such a ridge.
tr.v. ward·ed, ward·ing, wards Archaic
To guard; protect.
Phrasal Verb:
ward off
1. To turn aside; parry: ward off an opponent's blows.
2. To try to prevent; avert: took vitamins to ward off head colds.

[Middle English, action of guarding, from Old English weard, a watching, protection; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

ward

(wɔːd)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in many countries) a district into which a city, town, parish, or other area is divided for administration, election of representatives, etc
2. (Medicine) a room in a hospital, esp one for patients requiring similar kinds of care: a maternity ward.
3. (Law) one of the divisions of a prison
4. (Fortifications) an open space enclosed within the walls of a castle
5. (Law) law
a. Also called: ward of court a person, esp a minor or one legally incapable of managing his own affairs, placed under the control or protection of a guardian or of a court
b. guardianship, as of a minor or legally incompetent person
6. (Law) the state of being under guard or in custody
7. a person who is under the protection or in the custody of another
8. a means of protection
9. (Mechanical Engineering)
a. an internal ridge or bar in a lock that prevents an incorrectly cut key from turning
b. a corresponding groove cut in a key
10. a less common word for warden1
vb
(tr) archaic to guard or protect
[Old English weard protector; related to Old High German wart, Old Saxon ward, Old Norse vorthr. See guard]
ˈwardless adj

Ward

(wɔːd)
n
1. (Biography) Dame Barbara (Mary), Baroness Jackson. 1914–81, British economist, environmentalist, and writer. Her books include Spaceship Earth (1966)
2. (Biography) Mrs Humphry, married name of Mary Augusta Arnold. 1851–1920, English novelist. Her novels include Robert Elsmere (1888) and The Case of Richard Meynell (1911)
3. (Biography) Sir Joseph George. 1856–1930, New Zealand statesman; prime minister of New Zealand (1906–12; 1928–30)

ward

(wɔrd)

n.
1. a division or district of a city or town, as for administrative or political purposes.
2. one of the districts into which certain English and Scottish boroughs are divided.
3. a division or large room of a hospital for a particular class of patients: a convalescent ward.
4. any of the separate divisions of a prison.
5. one of the subdivisions of a stake in the Mormon Church, presided over by a bishop.
6. an open space within or between the walls of a castle.
7. a person, esp. a minor, who has been legally placed under the care of a guardian or a court.
8. the state of being under restraining guard or in custody.
9. a movement or posture of defense, as in fencing.
10. a curved ridge of metal in a lock, fitting only a key with a corresponding notch.
11. the notch or slot on a key into which such a ridge fits.
12. the act of keeping guard or protective watch: watch and ward.
v.t.
13. to avert or turn aside (danger, an attack, etc.) (usu. fol. by off): to ward off a blow.
14. to place in a ward, as of a hospital.
15. Archaic. to protect; guard.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English warde, Old English weard; (v.) Middle English; Old English weardian, c. Old Saxon wardon, Old High German wartēn, Old Norse vartha; compare guard]
ward′less, adj.

Ward

(wɔrd)

n.
1. (Aaron) Montgomery, 1843–1913, U.S. mail-order retailer.
2. Artemus (Charles Farrar Browne), 1834–67, U.S. humorist.
3. Barbara (Baroness Jackson of Lodsworth), 1914–81, British economist, journalist, and conservationist.
4. Mrs. Humphry (Mary Augusta Arnold), 1851–1920, English novelist, born in Tasmania.

-ward

a suffix denoting spatial or temporal direction, as specified by the initial element: afterward; backward; seaward. Also, -wards.
[Middle English; Old English -weard, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon -ward, Old High German -wart; akin to Latin vertere to turn (see verse)]
usage: Words formed with this suffix can be used as adverbs or adjectives. Although both -ward and -wards are standard for the adverbial use, the -ward form is more common in edited American English writing: to reach upward; to fall forward. The adjective form is always -ward: a backward glance.

Ward

 a body of guards or defenders, as a garrison (its use survives in wardroom); a body of watchmen, 1500; patients in a hospital ward, collectively, 1768.

ward


Past participle: warded
Gerund: warding

Imperative
ward
ward
Present
I ward
you ward
he/she/it wards
we ward
you ward
they ward
Preterite
I warded
you warded
he/she/it warded
we warded
you warded
they warded
Present Continuous
I am warding
you are warding
he/she/it is warding
we are warding
you are warding
they are warding
Present Perfect
I have warded
you have warded
he/she/it has warded
we have warded
you have warded
they have warded
Past Continuous
I was warding
you were warding
he/she/it was warding
we were warding
you were warding
they were warding
Past Perfect
I had warded
you had warded
he/she/it had warded
we had warded
you had warded
they had warded
Future
I will ward
you will ward
he/she/it will ward
we will ward
you will ward
they will ward
Future Perfect
I will have warded
you will have warded
he/she/it will have warded
we will have warded
you will have warded
they will have warded
Future Continuous
I will be warding
you will be warding
he/she/it will be warding
we will be warding
you will be warding
they will be warding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been warding
you have been warding
he/she/it has been warding
we have been warding
you have been warding
they have been warding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been warding
you will have been warding
he/she/it will have been warding
we will have been warding
you will have been warding
they will have been warding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been warding
you had been warding
he/she/it had been warding
we had been warding
you had been warding
they had been warding
Conditional
I would ward
you would ward
he/she/it would ward
we would ward
you would ward
they would ward
Past Conditional
I would have warded
you would have warded
he/she/it would have warded
we would have warded
you would have warded
they would have warded

ward

An electoral district of a town or city.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ward - a person who is under the protection or in the custody of another
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.ward - a district into which a city or town is divided for the purpose of administration and elections
administrative district, administrative division, territorial division - a district defined for administrative purposes
municipality - an urban district having corporate status and powers of self-government
3.ward - block forming a division of a hospital (or a suite of rooms) shared by patients who need a similar kind of careward - block forming a division of a hospital (or a suite of rooms) shared by patients who need a similar kind of care; "they put her in a 4-bed ward"
block - housing in a large building that is divided into separate units; "there is a block of classrooms in the west wing"
detox - the hospital ward or clinic in which patients are detoxified
hospital, infirmary - a health facility where patients receive treatment
maternity ward - a hospital ward that provides care for women during pregnancy and childbirth and for newborn infants
4.Ward - English economist and conservationist (1914-1981)
5.ward - English writer of novels who was an active opponent of the women's suffrage movement (1851-1920)Ward - English writer of novels who was an active opponent of the women's suffrage movement (1851-1920)
6.ward - United States businessman who in 1872 established a successful mail-order business (1843-1913)Ward - United States businessman who in 1872 established a successful mail-order business (1843-1913)
7.ward - a division of a prison (usually consisting of several cells)
block - housing in a large building that is divided into separate units; "there is a block of classrooms in the west wing"
jail cell, prison cell, cell - a room where a prisoner is kept
death house, death row - the cellblock in a prison where those condemned to death await execution
prison, prison house - a correctional institution where persons are confined while on trial or for punishment
Verb1.ward - watch over or shield from danger or harm; protect; "guard my possessions while I'm away"
protect - shield from danger, injury, destruction, or damage; "Weatherbeater protects your roof from the rain"
shepherd - watch over like a shepherd, as a teacher of her pupils

ward

noun
1. room, department, unit, quarter, division, section, apartment, cubicle A toddler was admitted to the emergency ward.
2. district, constituency, area, division, zone, parish, precinct Canvassers are focusing on marginal wards in this election.
3. dependant, charge, pupil, minor, protégé Richard became Burton's legal ward and took his name by deed poll.
ward someone off drive off, resist, confront, fight off, block, oppose, thwart, hold off, repel, fend off, beat off, keep someone at bay, keep someone at arm's length She may have tried to ward off her assailant.
ward something off
1. avert, turn away, fend off, stave off, avoid, block, frustrate, deflect, repel, forestall A rowan cross was hung over the door to ward off evil.
2. parry, avert, deflect, fend off, avoid, block, repel, turn aside He lifted his hands as if to ward off a blow.

ward

noun
1. A person who relies on another for support:
2. The state of being detained by legal authority:
3. The act or a means of defending:
4. A person or special body of persons assigned to provide protection or keep watch over, for example:
verb
1. To keep safe from danger, attack, or harm:
Archaic: fend.
2. To prohibit from occurring by advance planning or action.Also used with off:
phrasal verb
ward off
To turn or drive away:
Translations
جَنَاحجَناح من مُسْتَشْفى، قِسْمدَائِرَةقاصِر
obvodpokoj
stuetilsynsbarndistrikt
hallintoalueosasto
bolnička sobaodjel
gyámolt
deildskjólstæîingur
病棟
병실
palata
aizbilstamais
poručenec
oddelek
distriktsal
เขตเลือกตั้งตึกคนไข้
koğuşvesayet altında bulunan kimsebölge
phòng bệnhphường

ward

[wɔːd]
A. N
1. (Jur) (= person) → pupilo/a m/f
he is her ward(él) está bajo su tutela
to make sb a ward of courtponer a algn bajo la protección or el amparo del tribunal
2. (Pol) → distrito m electoral
3. (in hospital) → sala f, pabellón m
4. [of key] → guarda f
B. CPD ward heeler N (US) (Pol) → muñidor m
ward round N (Med) → visita f de salas
ward sister N (Med) → enfermera f jefe de sala
ward off VT + ADV [+ attack] → rechazar; [+ blow] → parar, desviar; [+ infection] → protegerse de; [+ danger] → protegerse contra, conjurar; [+ evil spirits] → conjurar
to ward off the coldprotegerse del frío

ward

[ˈwɔːrd] n
(in hospital)salle f
(= child) → pupille mf
ward off
vt seprepousserwar dance ndanse f guerrière

ward

n
(part of hospital) → Station f; (= room) (small) → (Kranken)zimmer nt; (large) → (Kranken)saal m
(Jur: = person) → Mündel nt; ward of courtMündel ntunter Amtsvormundschaft; to make somebody a ward of courtjdn unter Amtsvormundschaft stellen
(Jur: state) (to be) in wardunter Vormundschaft (stehen)
(Admin) → Stadtbezirk m; (= election ward)Wahlbezirk m
(of key)Einschnitt m(im Schlüsselbart); (of lock)Aussparung f, → Angriff m

ward

:
wardroom
n (Naut) → Offiziersmesse f
ward round
n (Med) → Visite f

ward

[wɔːd] n
a. (in hospital) → corsia, reparto
b. (Law) → pupillo/a
ward of court → minore m/f sotto tutela (giudiziaria)
c. (Pol) → collegio (elettorale)
ward off vt + adv (blow, attack) → parare, schivare; (attacker) → respingere; (danger, depression) → scongiurare

ward

(woːd) noun
1. a room with a bed or beds for patients in a hospital etc. He is in a surgical ward of the local hospital.
2. a person who is under the legal control and care of someone who is not his or her parent or (a ward of court) of a court. She was made a ward of court so that she could not marry until she was eighteen.
ˈwarder noun
a person who guards prisoners in a jail. He shot a warder and escaped from jail.

ward

جَنَاح, دَائِرَة obvod, pokoj distrikt, stue Bezirk, Station θάλαμος νοσοκομείου, συνοικία distrito, sala hallintoalue, osasto circonscription, service bolnička soba, odjel circoscrizione, corsia, 病棟, 병실 buurt, ziekenhuisafdeling avdeling, bydel oddział, pokój szpitalny ala de hospital, distrito палата, район distrikt, sal เขตเลือกตั้ง, ตึกคนไข้ bölge, koğuş phòng bệnh, phường 病房, 行政区

ward

n. sala de hospital;
isolation ___sala de aislamiento;
___ dietdieta hospitalaria;
___ of the statebajo custodia, bajo tutela del estado.

ward

n (of a hospital) sala; maternity — sala de maternidad; observation — sala de observación
References in periodicals archive ?
T is hard to imagine W S Gilbert pitching the plot of Iolanthe to a present-day producer: "You see, it's about a colony of fairies who meet the entire House of Lords in a rustic dingle and after a contretemps involving a half-mortal, half-fairy shepherd and his plans to marry the ward of court of the Lord Chancellor, the Fairy Queen uses her powers to subvert Parliament and the Peerage, but then the fairies fall in love with the Peers and the Fairy Queen herself takes a fancy to a sentry standing guard at Westminster and it turns out that the Lord Chancellor was married to a fairy all along.
The children -- aged nine, eight and five -- were in the care of a Paphos shelter, which has been made ward of court.
Yesterday's changes also get rid of the old Ward of Court system.
He said that, after B was removed from a flight to Turkey in December 2014 and made a ward of court, her parents had appeared to cooperate with police to stop her and her siblings accessing online terrorist propaganda.
Mr Justice Hayden made the teenager a ward of court - a move which bars him from leaving the jurisdiction of Wales and England.
Mrs Cotton, who used her own egg to conceive the child and the sperm of a man whose wife was infertile, was forced to leave the baby in hospital after she was made a ward of court.
The child was made a ward of court and the surrogate and her husband remained his legally-recognised parents.
Ashya will no longer be a ward of court once he is admitted to the Proton Therapy Centre in Prague.
The reunion initially appeared to be in doubt when Mr King claimed he would be barred from visiting the child after he was made a ward of court, but it was established that those proceedings do not stop the couple seeing him.
Still chance of a will Q My sister suffers from memory loss and is a ward of court, with social services and lawyers to control her affairs.
France's richest woman, at the centre of a scandal over alleged tax evasion, money laundering and illegal political funding, said on Friday she was relieved her daughter had failed to have her made a ward of court.
Laura Dekker was hoping to challenge the record set by 17-year-old Briton Mike Perham but she has now been made a ward of court, so that her parents, who support her plans, temporarily lose the right to make decisions about her.