Water dipper

Water dipper

In households where there was no running water, it was common for everyone to drink directly from the dipper used to dip water from the water bucket. At least some recognized the fact that such a procedure was unsanitary because, by the 1920s, rural grade school students were getting lessons in how to make a throwaway drinking cup from a sheet of tablet paper. (There were, of course, no drinking fountains in rural schools, only a well or cistern and a bucket of water.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Taken at face value, the "drinking gourd" refers to the hollowed out gourd used by slaves (and other rural Americans) as a water dipper.
Hilario claimed he ordered Layson to get the water dipper which fell off the ship.
These seven very bright stars really do look like a water dipper.
Never concerned about bacteria or nitrates, Dad happily drank the spring water and encouraged every visitor to take a drink from our old-fashioned water dipper.
The Roman writer and former consul, Petronius, was ordered to commit suicide by Nero -a form of redundancy in the classical world I suppose -but to spite the emperor, Petronius smashed a fine and very costly water dipper carved in semi-precious stone, which he knew the Emperor coveted.
Communities, she said, should also practice water conservation measures by avoiding excessive water use and reusing water, like gathering and storing rainwater for daily chores, using water dipper instead of shower when taking a bath, turning off faucets properly, and immediately repairing leaking pipes and running toilets, among others.
She always used the handle of the water dipper to chip the ice.
It prompted hundreds of responses, with suggestions ranging from 'freedom', 'adventure', 'tranquility', and 'nature' to 'channel', 'triathlon', 'endurance' and even 'cake' - a popular post-dip energy boost for many cold water dippers.
The ancients used gourds to store wet and dry goods as milk and butter containers, water dippers, cups and all types of bowls, to haul items and as cooking and eating utensils.
I am of American Indian descent and I also make ceremonial rattles and water dippers from the "dipper"-type gourds for use in the Native American Sweat Ceremony.
Other items could safely be stored at room temperature: metal water dippers, pocket knives, cans of ground cinnamon, buttons, glassware, china and bricks.