food chain

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food chain
marine food chain diagram

food chain

n.
1. A succession of organisms in an ecological community that are linked to each other through the transfer of energy and nutrients, beginning with an autotrophic organism such as a plant and continuing with each organism being consumed by one higher in the chain.
2. Informal A competitive hierarchy: works high up in the corporate food chain.

food chain

n
1. (Biology) ecology a sequence of organisms in an ecosystem in which each species is the food of the next member of the chain
2. (Sociology) informal the hierarchy in an organization or society

food′ chain`


n.
Ecol.
a series of organisms interrelated in their feeding habits, the smallest being fed upon by a larger one, which in turn feeds a still larger one.
[1925–30]
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food chain
A typical food chain in a water community would include a plant that is eaten by tadpoles, a great diving beetle that eats tadpoles, a bullfrog that eats great diving beetles, and a river otter that consumes frogs.

food chain

(fo͞od)
The sequence of the transfer of food energy from one organism to another in an ecological community. In a typical food chain, plants are eaten by herbivores, which are then eaten by carnivores. These carnivores are in turn eaten by other carnivores. ♦ Many species of animals in an ecological community feed on both plants and animals, creating a complex system of interrelated food chains known as a food web. See more at consumer, producer.

food chain


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A series of different life forms linked by what they eat and what eats them.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.food chain - (ecology) a community of organisms where each member is eaten in turn by another memberfood chain - (ecology) a community of organisms where each member is eaten in turn by another member
bionomics, environmental science, ecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment
organic phenomenon - (biology) a natural phenomenon involving living plants and animals
food cycle, food web - (ecology) a community of organisms where there are several interrelated food chains
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent advances in molecular biotechnology, immunology and cell and tissue culture techniques have enabled present-day biologists to penetrate deep into the intricate web of life.
Web of Life investigates and explains biodiversity - the coexistence of a wide variety of animal and plant species in their natural environments - and contains several live animal exhibits including a colony of hundreds of leaf-cutter ants.
quoted words allegedly spoken by 19th-century Indian Chief Seattle: "Man did not weave the web of life.
Overfishing, as well as the dumping of poisonous hydrocarbons and other materials, could result in the destruction of an intricate web of life.
Education has always been a vital tool for survival, a tool used to maneuver through the web of life, and also a tool used for adjustment.
Through dry and wet seasons, the deep, spongy muck remains a rich and stable home for a mindboggling web of life.
By 2050 or so, human population is expected to reach 9 billion and those billions will be seeking food, water and other resources on a planet where humans are already shaping climate and the web of life, according to Revkin.
Yet like the eagle and the salmon, the owl's presence indicates a healthy forest - a forest that can't sustain owls is a forest that is missing some strands in the web of life.
Cohen, author of "The Web of Life Imperative" says "The critical problems we face today are no surprise.
For anyone concerned about frogs, salamanders, and other amphibians' role as a key indicator species in the web of life, the author of the then authoritative Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution (1988) traces their origins from when they evolved from creatures with fins to their current decline and precarious future.
The Schad Gallery's revelations about the Web of Life are described elsewhere in this magazine, and are as gripping as the story of evolution will be in other galleries.
What you see (if you look) is a segment of the web of life.