Heraclitus

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Related to Weeping Philosopher: Heraclitean, Heraclitan, Heracletus

Her·a·cli·tus

 (hĕr′ə-klī′təs) fl. 500 bc.
Early Greek philosopher who maintained that strife and change are the natural conditions of the universe.

Her′a·cli′te·an (-tē-ən) adj.

Heraclitus

(ˌhɛrəˈklaɪtəs)
n
(Biography) ?535–?475 bc, Greek philosopher, who held that fire is the primordial substance of the universe and that all things are in perpetual flux

Her•a•cli•tus

(ˌhɛr əˈklaɪ təs)

n.
( “the Obscure” ) c540–c470 B.C., Greek philosopher.
Her`a•cli′te•an (-ti ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Heraclitus - a presocratic Greek philosopher who said that fire is the origin of all things and that permanence is an illusion as all things are in perpetual flux (circa 500 BC)Heraclitus - a presocratic Greek philosopher who said that fire is the origin of all things and that permanence is an illusion as all things are in perpetual flux (circa 500 BC)
Translations
Eraclito

Heraclitus

[ˌherəˈklaɪtəs] NHeráclito

Heraclitus

nHeraklit m
References in periodicals archive ?
The weeping philosopher saved the poor beast from its tormentor, an event that some say precipitated Nietzsche's madness.