Weil's disease


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Weil's disease

 (vīlz, wīlz) also Weil disease (vīl, wīl)
n.
A severe form of leptospirosis in humans that is characterized by jaundice, fever, muscle pain, kidney failure, and a tendency to hemorrhage.

[After Adolf Weil (1848-1916), German physician.]

Weil's disease

(vaɪlz)
n
1. (Pathology) another name for leptospirosis
2. (Veterinary Science) another name for leptospirosis
[named after Adolf Weil (1848–1916), German physician]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Weil's disease - a severe form of leptospirosis in human beingsWeil's disease - a severe form of leptospirosis in human beings
leptospirosis, swamp fever - an infectious disease cause by leptospira and transmitted to humans from domestic animals; characterized by jaundice and fever
References in periodicals archive ?
Anthony Wright, 48, collapsed with Weil's disease after a trip to France and medics feared his kidneys would fail.
The severe form of leptospirosis, known as Weil's disease, has a relatively high mortality rate.
Ichinose and colleagues reported one of the earliest clusters of six fatal cases of LS-caused Weil's disease with hepatorenal failure in Louisiana in 1963.
A MAN is being tested for rat-borne Weil's Disease after becoming unwell after a rat leapt from a dumped rubbish bag in his street.
Sean said a hot spot for rats, which carry potentially fatal illnesses such as Weil's disease, is Dock Road in Garston where the rodents congregate near sewers.
He said the levels suggested there was a risk of water-borne diseases like Weil's disease or typhoid fever.
The cause of Weil's disease was isolated independently in 1915 in Japan and Germany.
The most distinctive form of severe illness that may develop after the acute phase of illness is Weil's disease, characterized by impaired hepatic and renal function.
Mr Bragg said rats posed a serious risk to public health, with the vermin carrying all kinds of potentially fatal diseases, including bubonic plague, salmonella, rat bite fever, Weil's disease and murine typhus.
Brown rats are known transmitters of a number of diseases, including Weil's disease, which can lead to jaundice.
Rats carry a disease called leptospirosis or Weil's disease.