welfare economics

(redirected from Welfare economy)
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welfare economics

n (functioning as singular)
(Economics) the aspects of economic theory concerned with the welfare of society and priorities to be observed in the allocation of resources
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Madam Seema Mughal, Vice Chancellor - Greenwich University, shared that KRC is a step towards the realization of Quaid's dream of a democratic State, a welfare economy, and a pluralistic society - also reiterated in Pakistan's Vision 2025.
My ministers will continue to bring the public finances under control so that Britain lives within its means, and to move to a higher wage and lower welfare economy where work is rewarded.
Scotland Office Minister Andrew Dunlop said: The UK Governments National Living Wage is key to our commitment to generate a higher wage, lower tax, lower welfare economy.
In it's annual "Cities Outlook" report, the think tank said some cities were achieving a goal set by Chancellor George Osborne in his Budget statement last July, when he said: "We have to move Britain from a low wage, high tax, high welfare society to a higher wage, lower tax, lower welfare economy.
The report's authors say the figures make Liverpool a prime example of a low wage and high welfare economy.
At the other end of the scale, London, Reading, Aldershot, Aberdeen and Milton Keynes were among those with a high wage, low welfare economy.
In his Budget statement last July, Mr Osborne said: "We have to move Britain from a low-wage, high-tax, high-welfare society to a higher wage, lower tax, lower welfare economy.
She added that some believe that welfare economy philosophy is the one which provides subsidy to energy.
What we need to do is move from being a low wage, high tax, high welfare economy to a higher wage, lower tax, lower welfare economy.
An Australia which succeeds in remaining a high-wage generous social welfare economy, which should be our goal, must be agile, must be dynamic, must be looking to the future.
Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith opened the debate by insisting cuts would help the poor and move Britain from a "low wage, high tax and high welfare economy to a higher wage, lower tax and lower welfare society.
Colne Valley Tory MP Jason McCartney claimed the Budget delivered security for working people and kept Britain moving from a low wage, high tax, high welfare economy to a higher wage, lower tax and lower welfare country, adding: "The new National Living Wage and tax cuts for working families will boost take-home pay for those who work hard and want to get on in life.

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