well dressing


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well dressing

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the decoration of wells with flowers, etc: a traditional annual ceremony of great antiquity in some parts of Britain, originally associated with the cult of water deities
References in periodicals archive ?
bar] WELL, WELL: With their designs for the well dressing are, from left, Holly Brown (9), Hannah Bendon (8) and Esme Owens (7) of Scholes J&I School (PW150612Bwell-01)
The tradition of the boards, which are known as Well Dressings, dates back to 1349 where people in Derbyshire decorated their local wells which appeared to protect their clean water from the plague.
Known locally as well dressing, it's thought the practice began back in pagan times, long before the Romans, as a way of giving thanks for a continued source of clear fresh water.
We also took the chance to have a close look at the well dressings.
Well dressing is practised in around 80 villages, frequently involves almost the whole population of the area and can take up to ten days to perform.
For a list of villages and dates of well dressings visit: www.