West Germanic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

West Germanic

n.
A subdivision of the Germanic languages that includes High German, Low German, Yiddish, Dutch, Afrikaans, Flemish, Frisian, and English.

West Germanic

n
(Languages) a subbranch of the Germanic languages that consists of English, Frisian, Dutch, Flemish, Afrikaans, Low German, German, Yiddish, and their associated dialects

West′ German′ic


n.
the branch of Germanic that includes English, Frisian, Dutch, and German. Abbr.: WGmc
[1890–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.West Germanic - a branch of the Germanic languages
Germanic, Germanic language - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages; members that are spoken currently fall into two major groups: Scandinavian and West Germanic
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
German language, High German, German - the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic
Low German, Plattdeutsch - a German dialect spoken in northern Germany
Dutch - the West Germanic language of the Netherlands
Frisian - a West Germanic language spoken in Friesland in the northwestern Netherlands; a near relative of English
References in periodicals archive ?
Romance *randon was derived from the West Germanic/Frankish roots *rand and *rant 'a running', related to ModG rennen, from West Germanic *rannjan, from Germanic *ranjan.
Empirical data from the West Germanic languages are particularly challenging in this respect, showing the possibility of free argument serialization in the computational system, a phenomenon usually referred to as scrambling in the literature.
The West Germanic language of the English divided historically into Old English, Middle English, and Modern English and now spoken in the British Isles, the United States and numerous other countries.
Stoklund notes that some which appear to have a west Germanic linguistic form have a Scandinavian/north Germanic archaeological provenance.
There is evidence that a corresponding deity named Thunor, or Thonar, was worshiped by West Germanic peoples in England and continental Europe, but little is known about him.
At the heart of HOEM is Fulk's review of the arguments for dating and dialectal origins that were derived from such evidence as West Germanic parasiting, loss of intervocalic h, contraction of adjacent vowels in don and gan, compensatory lengthening after loss of h, changes in the metrical treatment of tertiary stress, and syncopation in long-stemmed verbs.
The evolution of Germanic phonological systems; proto-Germanic, gothic, West Germanic, and Scandinavian.
The forms containing a geminate consonant, frequently attested in the analysed corpus, can be attributed precisely to the influence of ja-stems, in which the stem formative occasions doubling of the root final consonant in line with the process of West Germanic Gemination, e.
To adduce 'Easter'/'Ostern' as proof that West Germanic knew this formation, too, is of course to argue in a vicious circle.
1]-, lost as an independent item in North and East Germanic, but retained in West Germanic, with an anomalous reduplicated preterite.
Putnam (Carson-Newman College) takes up the challenge by investigating the syntactic properties of middle field Scrambling in synchronic West Germanic languages, and the extent to which it can be classified as a syntactic phenomenon with minimalist desiderata.
The aim of the present paper is to compare word-order patterns of two West Germanic languages, English and High German, at the early stage of their development, on the example of one clause type, namely non-conjoined declarative clauses.

Full browser ?