Westminster


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West·min·ster

 (wĕst′mĭn′stər) Officially City of Westminster.
A borough of Greater London in southeast England on the Thames River. It includes the principal offices of the British government, especially along Downing Street and Whitehall, and such famous structures as Westminster Abbey and Buckingham Palace.

Westminster

(ˈwɛstˌmɪnstə)
n
1. (Placename) Also called: City of Westminster a borough of Greater London, on the River Thames: contains the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and Buckingham Palace. Pop: 222 000 (2003 est). Area: 22 sq km (8 sq miles)
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the Houses of Parliament at Westminster

West•min•ster

(ˈwɛstˌmɪn stər)

n.
1. a central borough (officially a city) of Greater London, England: Westminster Abbey, Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace. 173,400.
2. a city in SW California. 73,320.
3. a city in NE Colorado. 73,890.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Westminster - a borough of Greater London on the Thames; contains Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey
British capital, capital of the United Kingdom, Greater London, London - the capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center
Buckingham Palace - the London residence of the British sovereign
Downing Street - a street of Westminster in London; "the Prime Minister lives at No. 10 Downing Street"
Houses of Parliament - the building in which the House of Commons and the House of Lords meet
Westminster Abbey - a famous Gothic church of St. Peter in Westminster, London on the site of a former Benedictine monastery; "Westminster Abbey is the scene of the coronations of almost all English monarchs"; "Distinguished English subjects are buried in Westminster Abbey"
Translations

Westminster

[ˈwestˌmɪnstəʳ] N (Brit) → Westminster m
WESTMINSTER
Westminster, también llamado City of Westminster, es el distrito del centro de Londres que comprende el Parlamento (Houses of Parliament), la Abadía de Westminster (Westminster Abbey) y el Palacio de Buckingham (Buckingham Palace). Este nombre se usa también normalmente en los medios de comunicación para referirse al Parlamento o a los parlamentarios británicos.

Westminster

[ˈwɛstmɪnstər] n (British) (= UK Parliament) → Westminster mWest Point n école militaire américaineWest Virginia nVirginie-Occidentale f

Westminster

[ˈwɛstˌmɪnstəʳ] nil parlamento (britannico)
References in classic literature ?
Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminster.
This went on for weeks; he had taken a lodging at Vauxhall in which to pass the day and rest himself; and from this place, when the tide served, he usually came to London Bridge from Westminster by water, in order that he might avoid the busy streets.
She settled in two tiny rooms in Westminster, and faced the world anew.
It was at Westminster that the cause was to come on.
When he reached the Abbey, he turned back and crossed Westminster Bridge and sat down to watch the trails of smoke behind the Houses of Parliament catch fire with the sunset.
If it please any man spiritual or temporal," he says, to buy a certain book, "let him come to Westminster in to the Almonry at the Red Pale and he shall have them good cheap.
He went up to London towards mid-day and ate a slice of turkey and some Christmas pudding by himself at Gatti's, and since he had nothing to do afterwards went to Westminster Abbey for the afternoon service.
I fancy it was well for me at this period to have got at the four great English reviews, the Edinburgh, the Westminster, the London Quarterly, and the North British, which I read regularly, as well as Blackwood's Magazine.
SOUTH of the armory of Westminster Palace lay the gardens, and here, on the third day following the King's affront to De Vac, might have been a seen a blackhaired woman gowned in a violet cyclas, richly embroidered with gold about the yoke and at the bottom of the loose-pointed sleeves, which reached almost to the similar bordering on the lower hem of the garment.
Godolphin Street, Westminster, is only a few minutes' walk from Whitehall Terrace.
When that man was a boy, he went to Westminster School.
That singular smoky sparkle, at once a confusion and a transparency, which is the strange secret of the Thames, was changing more and more from its grey to its glittering extreme as the sun climbed to the zenith over Westminster, and two men crossed Westminster Bridge.