whaling

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whal·ing

 (wā′lĭng, hwāl′-)
n.
The business or practice of hunting, killing, and processing whales.

whaling

(ˈweɪlɪŋ)
n
(Fishing) the work or industry of hunting and processing whales for food, oil, etc
adv
informal (intensifier): a whaling good time.

whal•ing

(ˈʰweɪ lɪŋ, ˈweɪ-)

n.
the work or industry of capturing and rendering whales; whale fishing.
[1680–90]
Translations

whaling

[ˈweɪlɪŋ]
A. Npesca f de ballenas
to go whalingir a pescar ballenas
B. CPD whaling ship Nballenero m
whaling station Nestación f ballenera

whaling

hweɪlɪŋ] npêche f à la baleine

whaling

nWal(fisch)fang m; to go whalingauf Walfang gehen; whaling shipWalfänger m, → Walfangschiff nt; whaling stationWalfangstation f

whaling

[ˈweɪlɪŋ] ncaccia alla balena
References in periodicals archive ?
Morgan, one of the last whaling ships in operation.
Fisheries Minister Einar Kristinn Gudfinnsson told Iceland's parliament that his ministry would begin issuing licences to whaling ships to hunt fin and minke whales.
The timber will be put to use in restoring one of the world's last wooden whaling ships, the Charles W.
When Bishop Stringer arrived at Herschel Island in 1893, whaling ships were active in the Beaufort Sea, but the Europeans brought alcohol and disease to the native population along with trade goods.
Robert Holden paints a vibrant picture of life in the 19th century, in colonial Australia, in the Royal Navy and aboard the whaling ships of the time.
You are about to enter a nineteenth century world of whaling ships, where you will sail with the crew of the Pequod as they hunt whales for their oil around the world.
Whaling ships began to call at the islands for fresh water and to lay in rich larder from the astronomical numbers of birds and sea turtles found there.
Evolutionary biologist at the University of Utah, David Carrier, and his colleagues, were particularly intrigued by two well-documented cases of early whaling ships being rammed and sunk by ornery whales.
As reported in the Daily Post on Friday, November 8 - the same day as the HMS Trafalgar story - the Japanese have taken advantage of a similar loophole to send five whaling ships to the Antarctic to kill some 400 minke whales, also for research.
After graduating, Hirai joined the Tokyo-based Kyodo Sempaku company, a firm operating a fleet of whaling ships, in 1992, six years after Japan had given up commercial whaling in compliance with an international moratorium.
Gray whales were once a big name on the endangered species list, hunted from canoes and whaling ships until their numbers dwindled to little more than 4,000.
Soon, American whaling ships were sailing all over the world.