whiffler

whiffler

(ˈwɪflə)
n
a person who whiffles

whiffler

(ˈwɪflə)
n
(Historical Terms) archaic an attendant who cleared the way for a procession
[C16: from wifle battle-axe, from Old English wifel, of Germanic origin; the attendants originally carried weapons to clear the way]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The coracoid approach was first described by Whiffler (21) and later modified by Wilson who, with the help of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR), determined that the ideal puncture site in adults was 2 cm medial and 2 cm caudal to the lateral tip of the coracoid process.
10) Dozens of whifflers (armed attendants with javelins, battle-axes, swords, or staffs ["whiffler"]) and "Attenders" came next, sometimes called "guides," ordered to "conducte the Pageants" (Sayle 37; MSC 3: 116; MSC 3: 117).
After the whifflers, there might be one hundred company bachelors, more whifflers, the plaster pageants carried by porters or drawn by horses, more musicians, and, if in London, the Lord Mayor and his officers (MSC 3: xxiin, xxvi).
While the traders knew of the potential forces that might impel the performers and spectators to act violently on each other, they charged the whifflers explicitly to shield not the performers or spectators, but the plaster pageants.
That certainly does not mean that Rainbow High is the best horse ever to win the Chester Cup, as the race's roll of honour includes 19th-century champions Alice Hawthorn, Nancy, Tim Whiffler and Asteroid, as well as 20th-century celebrities Willonyx, Brown Jack, Trelawny and Sea
With a 30 litre feed hopper and an output of 150 bags a minute, the TT100's user-friendly mechanical controls allow dosing weights to be altered while the machine is running, say the makers, who are located at Whiffler Road, Norwich, Norfolk, tel:01603 429231.