Whig


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Whig

 (wĭg, hwĭg)
n.
1. A member of an 18th- and 19th-century British political party that was opposed to the Tories.
2. A supporter of the war against England during the American Revolution.
3. A 19th-century American political party formed to oppose the Democratic Party and favoring high tariffs and a loose interpretation of the Constitution.

[Probably short for Whiggamore, , a member of a body of 17th-century Scottish Presbyterian rebels.]

Whig′ger·y n.
Whig′gish adj.
Whig′gism n.

Whig

(wɪɡ)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the English political party or grouping that opposed the succession to the throne of James, Duke of York, in 1679–80 on the grounds that he was a Catholic. Standing for a limited monarchy, the Whigs represented the great aristocracy and the moneyed middle class for the next 80 years. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries the Whigs represented the desires of industrialists and Dissenters for political and social reform. The Whigs provided the core of the Liberal Party
2. (Historical Terms) (in the US) a supporter of the War of American Independence. Compare Tory
3. (Historical Terms) a member of the American political party that opposed the Democrats from about 1834 to 1855 and represented propertied and professional interests
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a conservative member of the Liberal Party in Great Britain
5. (Economics) a person who advocates and believes in an unrestricted laissez-faire economy
6. (Historical Terms) history a 17th-century Scottish Presbyterian, esp one in rebellion against the Crown
adj
(Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to Whigs
[C17: probably shortened from whiggamore, one of a group of 17th-century Scottish rebels who joined in an attack on Edinburgh known as the whiggamore raid; probably from Scottish whig to drive (of obscure origin) + more, mer, maire horse, mare1]
ˈWhiggery, ˈWhiggism n
ˈWhiggish adj
ˈWhiggishly adv
ˈWhiggishness n

Whig

(ʰwɪg, wɪg)

n.
1. a member of a political party in Great Britain (c1679–1832) that favored reforms and parliamentary authority.
2. a member of a U.S. political party (c1834–55) formed in opposition to the Democratic Party and favoring high tariffs and a weak presidency.
3. an American colonist who supported the American Revolution.
adj.
4. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Whigs.
[1635–45; earlier, a Covenanter, hence an opponent of the accession of James II; of uncertain orig., though probably in part a shortening of whiggamaire (later whiggamore), a participant in the Whiggamore Raid, a march against the royalists in Edinburgh launched by Covenanters in 1648]
Whig′gish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Whig - a member of the political party that urged social reform in 18th and 19th century England; was the opposition party to the Tories
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
liberal, liberalist, progressive - a person who favors a political philosophy of progress and reform and the protection of civil liberties
2.Whig - a supporter of the American Revolution
admirer, booster, protagonist, supporter, champion, friend - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
3.Whig - a member of the Whig Party that existed in the United States before the American Civil War
pol, political leader, politico, politician - a person active in party politics
Translations

Whig

[wɪg] (Pol, Hist)
A. N político liberal de los siglos XVII y XVIII
B. ADJliberal

Whig

(Brit Hist)
n frühere Bezeichnung für ein Mitglied der liberalen Partei, → Whig m
adj attrWhig-; Whig governmentWhig-Regierung f
References in classic literature ?
Had it been otherwise -- had an active politician been put into this influential post, to assume the easy task of making head against a Whig Collector, whose infirmities withheld him from the personal administration of his office -- hardly a man of the old corps would have drawn the breath of official life within a month after the exterminating angel had come up the Custom-House steps.
It appears to me -- who have been a calm and curious observer, as well in victory as defeat -- that this fierce and bitter spirit of malice and revenge has never distinguished the many triumphs of my own party as it now did that of the Whigs.
Then we loafed along past the Nickersons, and of course they asked if that was the new stranger yonder, and where'd he come from, and what was his name, and which communion was he, Babtis' or Methodis', and which politics, Whig or Democrat, and how long is he staying, and all them other questions that humans always asks when a stranger comes, and animals does, too.
But I confess, that, after I had been a little too copious in talking of my own beloved country, of our trade and wars by sea and land, of our schisms in religion, and parties in the state; the prejudices of his education prevailed so far, that he could not forbear taking me up in his right hand, and stroking me gently with the other, after a hearty fit of laughing, asked me, "whether I was a whig or tory?
Some surprise had been expressed that a person of Colonel Joliffe's known Whig principles, though now too old to take an active part in the contest, should have remained in Boston during the siege, and especially that he should consent to show himself in the mansion of Sir William Howe.
He had ambitions that were vaguely political, he described himself as a Whig, and he was put up for a club which was of Liberal but gentlemanly flavour.
I shall tell everybody that you are going to put up for Middlemarch on the Whig side when old Pinkerton resigns, and that Casaubon is going to help you in an underhand manner: going to bribe the voters with pamphlets, and throw open the public-houses to distribute them.
He threw himself into the struggle of party, first as a Whig, then as a Tory; but as a friend said of him later, "He was neither Whig nor Tory, neither Jacobite nor Republican.
But while Charles was outwardly, for political reasons, a member of the Church of England (at heart he was a Catholic), the Duke of York was a professed and devoted Catholic, and the powerful Whig party, strongly Protestant, was violently opposed to him.
You have made a Whig of the girl; and how should her father, or anybody else, expect any obedience from her?
13] Whig or Whigamore was the cant name for those who were loyal to King George.
It is needless to say that Sir Pitt was brought to change his views after the death of the great Whig statesman.