White Hmong


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to White Hmong: Green Hmong

White Hmong

n.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Sovereignty and Rebellion: The White Hmong of Northern Thailand, Singapore, Oxford University Press, 1989.
In a substantial revision of her 1991 PhD dissertation at the University of Sydney, Jarkey examines the phenomenon of serial verb constructions in White Hmong, a language spoken in the mountainous regions of southern China and mainland Southeast Asia, and by a number of diasporic communities around the world.
See also Nicholas Tapp, Sovereignty and rebellion: The White Hmong of Northern Thailand (Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1989).
It has two main dialects--White Hmong and Green Hmong--with most agreeing that White Hmong can be read by all.
Here, white Hmong (Hmong Peu) and Yao women visit the weekly market at Muong So
According to the White Hmong English Dictionary (Heimbach, 1969), ceeb is defined as "to be tense, frightened, startled" (p.
voiced concerns about the Assembly bill," and "have come forward to demand that they be recognized separately in the bill, as a way to reverse what they say is long-standing subordination to the more dominant Hmong Der, or White Hmong.
Jacques Lemoine, Un village Hmong vert du Haut Laos (Pads: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1972); Yang Dao, Les Hmong de Laos face au developpement (Vientiane: Siaosavath, 1975); William Geddes, Migrants of the Mountains (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1976); Robert Cooper, Resource Scarcity and the Hmong Response (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 1984); Nicholas Tapp, Sovereignty and Rebellion: The White Hmong of Northern Thailand (Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1989).
Geddes, Migrants of the Mountains: The Cultural Ecology of the Blue Miao (Hmong Njua) of Thailand (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1976); Robert Cooper, Resource Scarcity and the Hmong Response (Singapore: Singapore University Press, 1984); Nicholas Tapp, Sovereignty and Rebellion: The White Hmong of Northern Thailand (Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1989); Yang Dao, op.
Up the Mountain Village (pseudonym) is a White Hmong Village in Northern Thailand that has undergone significant social, economic, and cultural changes from 1991 to 2013.