white lady

(redirected from White Ladies)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

white lady

n
1. (Brewing) a cocktail consisting of gin, Cointreau, and lemon juice
2. (Brewing) informal Austral methylated spirits as a drink, sometimes mixed with shoe polish or other additives
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I could not approach her as I was accustomed to approach other white ladies.
Motown Records' staff and roster supported the campaign, including Grammy- nominated BJ the Chicago Kid , Kevin Ross , James Davis and Rich White Ladies , among many others.
They perform in the style of the Welsh Border Morris Men and skipped to an array of traditional dances including the Dilwyn, the White Ladies Aston, The Evesham Stick Dance and the Bromsberrow Heath.
Ladies and gentlemen from Washington Grange, St Georges and Albany care homes, the White Ladies retirement housing, along with the Holy Trinity Church congregation will embark on an evening of festivities on Wednesday December 10 at Washington School.
A white painted boulder named the White Cross, near Westerdale, is believed to have been blessed in response to deliverance by a group of Cistercian nuns or White Ladies after finding themselves lost in a fog on a pilgrimage from York to Baysdale Abbey.
One of the white ladies is wearing a gay pride button and I imagine that Trayvon's opinion of gays may have been similar to his suspicion of "creepy ass crackers.
Bristol BBC is on Whiteladies Road at the end of which is Blackboy Hill where the white ladies were carried up in sedan chairs.
The Worcestershire village of Peopleton and the neighbouring villages of Drakes Broughton and White Ladies Aston are packed with characterful homes.
About the only verboten activity is "racial profiling," which is why the beefy agents of the TSA blithely harass heroes such as Joe Foss and little old white ladies.
White ladies, spectral children and ghostly animals abound here, making one wonder who is really left alive in all of England, and whether one would prefer to be a ghost when one looks so good in these photographs.
If, as historian Paula Giddings contends, "the cult [of true womanhood] caused Black women to prove they were ladies" and "forced White ladies to prove that they were women" (54, italics added), then novels such as West's The Living Is Easy demand a revised, modernist conception of political desire, one in which economically and socially privileged African American women struggle to come full circle, that is, to shed the constraints of a protected "lady-hood" for the freedom of an empowered womanhood.