white blood cell

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Related to White blood cells: Red blood cells

white blood cell

n. Abbr. WBC
Any of various cells that in adult mammals are produced in bone marrow, have a nucleus but no hemoglobin, and function in the immune system by protecting against pathogens and aiding in tissue repair. White blood cells include neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, and they are found in blood, lymph, and certain tissues. Also called leukocyte, white cell, white corpuscle.

white blood cell

n
(Biochemistry) a nontechnical name for leucocyte

white′ blood′ cell`


n.
any of various nearly colorless cells of the immune system that circulate mainly in the blood and lymph, comprising the B cells, T cells, macrophages, monocytes, and granulocytes. Also called leukocyte , white′ blood′ cor`puscle, white′ cell`.

white blood cell

(wīt)
Any of various white or colorless cells in the blood of vertebrate animals, many of which act to protect the body against infection and to repair tissues after injury. White blood cells have a nucleus, unlike red blood cells, and are formed mainly in the bone marrow. The major types of white blood cells are granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes. Also called leukocyte.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.white blood cell - blood cells that engulf and digest bacteria and fungiwhite blood cell - blood cells that engulf and digest bacteria and fungi; an important part of the body's defense system
myelocyte - an immature leukocyte normally found in bone marrow
myeloblast - a precursor of leukocytes that normally occurs only in bone marrow
blood cell, blood corpuscle, corpuscle - either of two types of cells (erythrocytes and leukocytes) and sometimes including platelets
free phagocyte - a phagocyte that circulates in the blood
lymph cell, lymphocyte - an agranulocytic leukocyte that normally makes up a quarter of the white blood cell count but increases in the presence of infection
granulocyte - a leukocyte that has granules in its cytoplasm
monocyte - a type of granular leukocyte that functions in the ingestion of bacteria
basophil, basophile - a leukocyte with basophilic granules easily stained by basic stains
neutrophil, neutrophile - the chief phagocytic leukocyte; stains with either basic or acid dyes
eosinophil, eosinophile - a leukocyte readily stained with eosin
Translations
bílá krvinka
leukosyyttivalkosolu
白血球
witte bloedcel
vit blodkropp
References in periodicals archive ?
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i whi cubic There are only 3,000-7,000 white blood cells in every cubic millimetre of blood.
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Shortened telomeres in white blood cells might induce those immune cells to trigger inflammation, surmise Ioakim Spyridopoulos and Stefanie Dimmeler of the University of Frankfurt in Germany, also writing in the Jan.
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The standard way to investigate suspected appendicitis is to isolate white blood cells from a patient, tag them in vitro with a radioisotope, infuse them back into the patient, and then do imaging to look for a focus of white cells in the abdomen.
During each cycle of fasting, this depletion of white blood cells induces changes that trigger stem cell-based regeneration of new immune system cells.