Whitehall


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White·hall 1

(wīt′hôl′, hwīt′-)
A wide thoroughfare in London, England, running south from Trafalgar Square to the Houses of Parliament. Named after Whitehall Palace, the seat of English monarchs from 1529 until its destruction by fire in 1698, Whitehall is noted for its government offices.

White·hall 2

(wīt′hôl′, hwīt′-)
n.
The British civil service.

[After Whitehall1.]

Whitehall

(ˌwaɪtˈhɔːl)
n
1. (Placename) a street in London stretching from Trafalgar Square to the Houses of Parliament: site of the main government offices
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the British Government or its central administration
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Whitehall - a wide street in London stretching from Trafalgar Square to the Houses of ParliamentWhitehall - a wide street in London stretching from Trafalgar Square to the Houses of Parliament; site of many government offices
British capital, capital of the United Kingdom, Greater London, London - the capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center
2.Whitehall - the British civil serviceWhitehall - the British civil service    
civil service - government workers; usually hired on the basis of competitive examinations
Translations

Whitehall

[ˌwaɪtˈhɔːl] N calle de Londres en la cual hay muchos ministerios (fig) → el gobierno británico
WHITEHALL
Whitehall es la calle de Londres que va desde Trafalgar Square al Parlamento (Houses of Parliament), calle en la que se hallan la mayoría de los ministerios. Su nombre se usa con frecuencia para referirse conjuntamente a la Administración (Civil Service) y a los ministerios, cuando se trata de sus funciones administrativas.

Whitehall

hwaɪthɔːl] n
(= place) à Londres, quartier gouvernemental
(= British government) → le gouvernement britanniquewhite-hot hwaɪtˈhɒt] adj [metal] → incandescent(e)White House n
the White House → la Maison-Blanchewhite knight n (in business)chevalier m blancwhite-knuckle hwaɪtˈnʌlel] adj
[ride] (in fairground)pour amateurs de sensations fortes
white-knuckle rides such as the rollercoaster → les attractions pour amateurs de sensations fortes telles que les montagnes russes
[experience] → riche en adrénaline
a hellish white-knuckle ride through the heavy London traffic
BUT une virée infernale et échevelée à travers la dense circulation londonienne.white lie npieux mensonge mwhite line n (on road)ligne f blanchewhite list n
(British) (= list of "safe" countries) en Grande-Bretagne, liste de pays considérés comme sûrs et dont les ressortissants ne peuvent par conséquent pas prétendre au statut de demandeurs d'asile
(= list of "safe" websites, e-mail addresses) → liste f blanche liste de sites Web considérés comme sûrswhite meat nviande f blanchewhite meter n
white meter heating → chauffage m par accumulateur

Whitehall

[ˈwaɪtˌhɔːl] n (street) strada londinese dove hanno sede i ministeri del governo inglese; (British Government) → il governo inglese
References in classic literature ?
Troy set forth for the Head Office in Whitehall to consult the police on the question of the missing money.
Not long afterward we answered a shoreward hail, and two Whitehall boats, each pulled by three pairs of oars, darted up to us.
You can tell them, if they ring up from Whitehall, that I'll report myself later in the evening.
John's to Whitehall - which I praise very highly, but no more than it deserves, when I say that it is superior even to that in which we went from Queenston to Toronto, or to that in which we travelled from the latter place to Kingston, or I have no doubt I may add to any other in the world.
It was of such importance that I have never left it in my safe, but have taken it across each evening to my house in Whitehall Terrace, and kept it in my bedroom in a locked despatch-box.
Go from Corlears Hook to Coenties Slip, and from thence, by Whitehall northward.
James's and at Whitehall, too," added the old man with a sigh.
As we sailed up the San Francisco water-front, the moment the port doctors passed us, the boarding-house runners were alongside in whitehall boats.
Today Whitehall had been transformed: it would be the turn of Regent Street tomorrow.
Seek, then, my lord, seek these gentlemen; and if they will consent to go with you to England, I will give to each a duchy the day that we reascend the throne, besides as much gold as would pave Whitehall.
The slender towers were washed by a rain of golden light and licked by little flickering flames; Somerset House and the bleached gray pinnacles about Whitehall were floated in a luminous haze.
It was acted by the gentlemen of the Inner Temple "before the Queen's most excellent Majestie in her highness' Court of Whitehall the 18th day of January, 1561.