Whitsuntide


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Related to Whitsuntide: Whitsunday

Whit·sun·tide

also Whit·sun Tide  (wĭt′sən-tīd′, hwĭt′-)
n.
The week beginning on Whitsunday, especially the first three days of this week.

Whitsuntide

(ˈwɪtsənˌtaɪd)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the week that begins with Whit Sunday, esp the first three days

Whit•sun•tide

(ˈʰwɪt sənˌtaɪd, ˈwɪt-)

n.
the week beginning with Whitsunday, esp. the first three days of this week.
[1175–1225; Middle English whitsone(n)tide. See Whitsun, tide1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Whitsuntide - Christian holidayWhitsuntide - Christian holiday; the week beginning on Whitsunday (especially the first 3 days)
church calendar, ecclesiastical calendar - a calendar of the Christian year indicating the dates of fasts and festivals
season - a period of the year marked by special events or activities in some field; "he celebrated his 10th season with the ballet company"; "she always looked forward to the avocado season"
Pentecost, Whitsunday - seventh Sunday after Easter; commemorates the emanation of the Holy Spirit to the Apostles; a quarter day in Scotland
Whitmonday, Whitsun Monday - the day after Whitsunday; a legal holiday in England and Wales and Ireland
Whitsun Tuesday, Whit-Tuesday - the day after Whitmonday
Translations

Whitsuntide

[ˈwɪtsntaɪd]
A. NPentecostés m
B. CPDde Pentecostés

Whitsuntide

n (Brit) → Pfingstzeit f; around Whitsuntideum Pfingsten (herum)
References in classic literature ?
My lord," said the guard, "I have simply mentioned the prophecy I heard from a man named Coysel, who believes that, be he ever so closely watched and guarded, the Duke of Beaufort will escape before Whitsuntide.
SOME time elapsed before I again gave a lesson in the first class; the holiday of Whitsuntide occupied three days, and on the fourth it was the turn of the second division to receive my instructions.
Why to the man of untutored ideality, who happens to be but loosely acquainted with the peculiar character of the day, does the bare mention of Whitsuntide marshal in the fancy such long, dreary, speechless processions of slow-pacing pilgrims, downcast and hooded with new-fallen snow?
If he went on in that way, he would lose Miss Nancy Lammeter; for it was well known that she had looked very shyly on him ever since last Whitsuntide twelvemonth, when there was so much talk about his being away from home days and days together.
The dejected gardener went mad soon after Whitsuntide, and had to be sent to an asylum.
Dickison leaning against the door-post with a melancholy pimpled face, looking as irrelevant to the daylight as a last night's guttered candle,--all this may not seem a very seductive form of temptation; but the majority of men in Basset found it fatally alluring when encountered on their road toward four o'clock on a wintry afternoon; and if any wife in Basset wished to indicate that her husband was not a pleasure-seeking man, she could hardly do it more emphatically than by saying that he didn't spend a shilling at Dickison's from one Whitsuntide to another.
For this is the story--the story of the strange things that did really happen in it in the Whitsuntide of the year
It is a poor heart that never rejoices, and Whitsuntide had an air of coming as an agreeable break in the business complications of Grubb & Smallways.
And the area had been a place for outside entertainment and leisure, with a Whitsuntide hoppings taking place in 1829.
The tradition of celebrating Whitsuntide (the week following Whit Sunday) goes back to medieval times when peasants enjoyed a week's holiday from their labours.
This is the modern replacement for the Whitsuntide Bank Holiday.
More than a decade later, the Whitsuntide excursion to Paris reinforced the disciplinary value of Continental travel by demonstrating that British workers could behave well abroad.