asparagus

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as·par·a·gus

 (ə-spăr′ə-gəs)
n.
1. The tender young shoots of the plant Asparagus officinalis, eaten as a vegetable.
2. Any of various perennial plants of the genus Asparagus of Eurasia and Africa, having leaflike stems, scalelike leaves, and small flowers.

[Late Middle English sperage, sparage, from Medieval Latin sparagus, from Latin asparagus, from Greek aspharagos, asparagos.]
Word History: After the rebirth of classical learning during the Renaissance, Greek and Latin achieved a lofty status among the educated. As a result, etymologists and spelling reformers of the 16th and 17th centuries tried to give English a classical look by Latinizing or Hellenizing the spelling of words that had Latin or Greek ancestry (and even some that didn't). For example, Medieval Latin had a word sparagus, from Classical Latin asparagus, that was borrowed into Middle English and rendered as sparage or, more commonly, sperage. Botanists were familiar with the proper Latin version asparagus, and their use of that term together with the efforts of the etymologists caused the Latin form to become more widespread, eventually supplanting sperage. In the 1600s, however, asparagus was shortened in popular speech to 'sparagus, and reanalyzed—this time by amateur etymologists—as sparagrass or sparrowgrass. These variants gained wide acceptance during the 18th century, largely relegating asparagus to the field of botany. Asparagus eventually found its way back into common use during the 19th century. Thus, it is difficult to say whether the Modern English word asparagus is a direct descendant of Middle English sperage or a borrowing directly from Latin—a difficulty one encounters with hundreds of other words whose spellings and even pronunciations were Latinized during this time.

asparagus

(əˈspærəɡəs)
n
1. (Plants) any Eurasian liliaceous plant of the genus Asparagus, esp the widely cultivated A. officinalis, having small scaly or needle-like leaves
2. (Plants) the succulent young shoots of A. officinalis, which may be cooked and eaten
3. (Plants) asparagus fern a fernlike species of asparagus, A. plumosus, native to southern Africa
[C15: from Latin, from Greek asparagos, of obscure origin]

as•par•a•gus

(əˈspær ə gəs)

n.
1. any plant of the genus Asparagus, of the lily family, esp. A. officinalis, cultivated for its edible shoots.
2. the shoots, eaten as a vegetable.
[1540–50; < Latin < Greek asp(h)áragos]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asparagus - plant whose succulent young shoots are cooked and eaten as a vegetableasparagus - plant whose succulent young shoots are cooked and eaten as a vegetable
asparagus - edible young shoots of the asparagus plant
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Asparagus - large genus of Old World perennial herbs with erect or spreading or climbing stems and small scalelike leaves and inconspicuous flowers; sometimes placed in family Asparagaceae
2.asparagus - edible young shoots of the asparagus plantasparagus - edible young shoots of the asparagus plant
veg, vegetable, veggie - edible seeds or roots or stems or leaves or bulbs or tubers or nonsweet fruits of any of numerous herbaceous plant
asparagus, Asparagus officinales, edible asparagus - plant whose succulent young shoots are cooked and eaten as a vegetable
Translations
chřest
asparges
parsa
šparoga
spárga
アスパラガス
아스파라거스
sparris
หน่อไม้ฝรั่ง
măng tây

asparagus

[əsˈpærəgəs]
A. N (= plant) → espárrago m; (= food) → espárragos mpl
B. CPD asparagus tips NPLpuntas fpl de espárrago

asparagus

[əˈspærəgəs] nasperges fplasparagus tips nplpointes fpl d'asperges

asparagus

n no plSpargel m

asparagus

[əsˈpærəgəs] n (plant) → asparago; (food) → asparagi mpl

asparagus

الهِلْيَوْن chřest asparges Spargel σπαράγγι espárrago parsa asperge šparoga asparago アスパラガス 아스파라거스 asperge asparges szparag aspargo, espargo спаржа sparris หน่อไม้ฝรั่ง kuşkonmaz măng tây 芦笋

asparagus

n espárrago
References in classic literature ?
The brook, of which the banks were clothed with dense masses of a gigantic species of maidenhair fern interspersed with feathery tufts of wild asparagus, sung merrily at our side, the soft air murmured through the leaves of the silver trees, doves cooed around, and bright-winged birds flashed like living gems from bough to bough.
They said that during a check they found 129 bunches of wild asparagus, 20 kilos of halloumi and 6 kilos anari.
Village board members agreed to stick with Wild Asparagus Catering to provide workers for White House events through Dec.
We then meet the extraordinary woman Joanna encountered by chance at an abandoned mountain town, before hearing her story over a shared meal of wild asparagus.
Climbing the Acropolis and scoffing wild asparagus with locals.
This lush, heart-shaped peninsula in the Adriatic is famous for seasonal produce such as truffles (tartufi), wild asparagus (&scaron;paroga) and a plentiful supply of fish and shellfish from the local coastlne.
You may have noticed wild asparagus growing in less than ideal sites.
I chance and re-chance upon / the stalks of wild asparagus, the crimson / rhubarb, the fern splayed into / the cow road's mucik.
The tasting menu really filled me up with food ranging from wild asparagus and blood sausage stew to venison loin marinated in fermented pineapple juice.
For one of my first batches, I used Euell Gibbons' recipe in Stalking the Wild Asparagus that called for cake yeast spread on toast to be floated on the tea.
It's the unexpected bounty and regenerative powers of nature that have deepened my connection with my hometown, my family, and even myself, transforming old feelings of being "not good enough" or "unworthy" into new ways of seeing and being, like fresh wild asparagus or violets erupting from the earth every spring.
Efforts to find wild asparagus have failed but there are several bags filled with greens.