mutant

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mu·tant

 (myo͞ot′nt)
n.
1. An organism, cell, virus, or gene resulting from genetic mutation.
2. Slang One that is suggestive of a genetic mutant, as in bizarre appearance or inaptitude.
adj.
1. Resulting from genetic mutation: a mutant strain of bacteria.
2. Slang Suggestive of a genetic mutant.

[Latin mūtāns, mūtant-, present participle of mūtāre, to change; see mutate.]

mutant

(ˈmjuːtənt)
n
(Genetics) Also called: mutation an animal, organism, or gene that has undergone mutation
adj
of, relating to, undergoing, or resulting from change or mutation
[C20: from Latin mutāre to change]

mu•tant

(ˈmyut nt)

n.
1. a new type of organism produced as the result of mutation.
adj.
2. undergoing or resulting from mutation.
[1900–05; < Latin mūtant- (s. of mūtāns), present participle of mūtāre to change]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mutant - (biology) an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alterationmutant - (biology) an organism that has characteristics resulting from chromosomal alteration
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
freak, lusus naturae, monstrosity, monster - a person or animal that is markedly unusual or deformed
2.mutant - an animal that has undergone mutation
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
Adj.1.mutant - tending to undergo or resulting from mutation; "a mutant gene"

mutant

noun
1. freak, monster, mutation, deviant, oddity, monstrosity, freak of nature, lusus naturae He will play the part of evil mutant, Magneto.
adjective
1. freakish, crooked, distorted, warped, deformed, misshapen stories about strange mutant beasts
Translations
mutant
Mutante
mutantti
mutant

mutant

[ˈmjuːtənt]
A. ADJmutante
B. Nmutante mf

mutant

[ˈmjuːtənt]
adjmutant(e)
nmutant m

mutant

nMutante f (spec), → Mutation f
adjmutierend

mutant

[ˈmjuːtənt] adj & nmutante (m/f)

mu·tant

a. mutante, rel. a un organismo que ha pasado por mutaciones.

mutant

adj & n mutante m
References in periodicals archive ?
All of them succumbed to the dengue wild-type virus, which is the regular strain,' she said, adding that tissue evaluation would still be needed for these three children.
Largescale deployment of these vaccines will raise the need to discriminate between potential vaccination-associated events and wild-type virus infection in symptomatic patients.
Thus, the SINV-3 genome was properly assembled into the pFastBac1 donor plasmid; in silico analyses of these amplified regions yielded start and stop codons, and ORFs identical to the wild-type virus.
Poordad noted that patients relapsed most commonly if they had either wild-type virus or resistant-associated variants (RAV) already present at baseline.
However wild-type virus, not vaccine virus, has been found in brain tissue of at least some of these patients, suggesting they had subclinical measles previously.
Slow speed of kill of wild-type baculoviruses when compared to chemical insecticides is a serious disadvantage that has promoted the development of large number of recombinant baculoviruses, mainly with genes encoding insect-specific toxins from scorpions or spiders, which kill insects faster than the parent wild-type virus.
In addition, the virus used in the vaccine has been labeled with unique markers to differentiate it from wild-type virus found in outbreaks.
The reprogrammed virus no longer infects the cells usually targeted by the wild-type virus, nor does it cause herpes-related pathologies.
One study showed the drug-resistant strains were less pathogenic than wild-type virus, whereas the other study found that the drug-resistant and wild-type viruses had similar pathogenicity.
7) This is due to the potential for an upwards shift in age of rubella infection because of the reduction of wild-type virus circulation and its consequent reduction in population immunity, resulting in increasing numbers of vulnerable women in the childbearing age group susceptible to a still-present reservoir of circulating wild-type virus.
Because they resemble actual infectious particles presenting proteins in the same conformation as on the wild-type virus, they are able to induce a potent immune response.
In addition, the vaccine strain may reactivate, causing a zoster-like illness similar to that caused by reactivation of the wild-type virus [7].