William the Conqueror


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Related to William the Conqueror: Richard the Lionheart, Magna Carta

William the Conqueror

William the Conqueror

n
(Biography) See William I1

Wil•liam

(ˈwɪl yəm)
n.
1. William I,
a. ( “the Conqueror” ) 1027–87, duke of Normandy 1035–87; king of England 1066–87.
b. (William I of Orange) ( “the Silent” ) 1533–84, Dutch leader born in Germany: 1st stadholder of the Netherlands 1578–84.
c. (Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig) 1797–1888, king of Prussia 1861–88; emperor of Germany 1871–88.
2. William II,
a. (William Rufus) ( “the Red” ) 1056?–1100, king of England 1087–1100 (son of William I, duke of Normandy).
b. (Frederick Wilhelm Viktor Albert) 1859–1941, king of Prussia and emperor of Germany 1888–1918.
3. William III, (William III of Orange) 1650–1702, stadholder of the Netherlands 1672–1702; king of England 1689–1702, joint ruler with his wife, Mary II.
4. William IV, 1765–1837, king of Great Britain and Ireland 1830–37 (brother of George IV).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.William the Conqueror - duke of Normandy who led the Norman invasion of England and became the first Norman to be King of EnglandWilliam the Conqueror - duke of Normandy who led the Norman invasion of England and became the first Norman to be King of England; he defeated Harold II at the battle of Hastings in 1066 and introduced many Norman customs into England (1027-1087)
References in classic literature ?
Don't you really know, Durbeyfield, that you are the lineal representative of the ancient and knightly family of the d'Urbervilles, who derive their descent from Sir Pagan d'Urberville, that renowned knight who came from Normandy with William the Conqueror, as appears by Battle Abbey Roll?
We didn't cook none of the pies in the wash-pan -- afraid the solder would melt; but Uncle Silas he had a noble brass warming-pan which he thought consider- able of, because it belonged to one of his ancesters with a long wooden handle that come over from Eng- land with William the Conqueror in the Mayflower or one of them early ships and was hid away up garret with a lot of other old pots and things that was valuable, not on account of being any account, be- cause they warn't, but on account of them being relicts, you know, and we snaked her out, private, and took her down there, but she failed on the first pies, because we didn't know how, but she come up smiling on the last one.
Perhaps it doesn't understand English,' thought Alice; `I daresay it's a French mouse, come over with William the Conqueror.
Impossible to class it in that ancient family of sombre, mysterious churches, low and crushed as it were by the round arch, almost Egyptian, with the exception of the ceiling; all hieroglyphics, all sacerdotal, all symbolical, more loaded in their ornaments, with lozenges and zigzags, than with flowers, with flowers than with animals, with animals than with men; the work of the architect less than of the bishop; first transformation of art, all impressed with theocratic and military discipline, taking root in the Lower Empire, and stopping with the time of William the Conqueror.
The mailed gentlemen of William the Conqueror divided and apportioned England amongst themselves with the naked sword.
There's also the opportunity to meet William the Conqueror and learn his tactical defence skills ready for battle.
France will lend Britain the Bayeux Tapestry, an 11th century treasure that tells the tale of how William the Conqueror came to invade England in 1066, an official at the presidential Elysee Palace in Paris said on Wednesday.
From which former duchy of France did William the Conqueror come?
October 14 is Be Bald and Be Free Day On this day: 1066 - Battle of Hastings where William the Conqueror defeats and kills King Harold II of England.
1087: William the Conqueror died in Rouen, France, from injuries received when his horse stumbled while he was fighting the King of France.
On October 14 1066, Harold, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, was killed on the East Sussex battlefield as he fought the invading Normans, and William the Conqueror seized the English throne.
MargaretThatcher's biographer Charles Moore has been musing over the Duke of Westminster's son paying a mere 6% tax on his PS9billion inheritance, and concluded: "It is encouraging that a man whose family first got rich because his ancestor was the fat huntsman of William the Conqueror has PS9bn today, 950 years later.