willow tit


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willow tit

n
(Animals) a small tit, Parus montanus, of marshy woods in Europe, having a greyish-brown body and dull black crown
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FARMLAND and woodland birds have been hit hardest, including the wood warbler, the lesser spotted woodpecker, willow tit, yellowhammers, larks and wading birds like lapwing.
Our woodland birds too are being badly hit, including the wood warbler, the lesser spotted woodpecker and willow tit.
These species included the cuckoo, starling, willow tit, lapwing, whinchat and wood warbler.
There aren't many reed beds They include skylark, lesser redpoll, linnet, cuckoo, yellowhammer, r eed bunting, herring gull, yellow wagtail, spotted flycatcher, curlew, house and tree sparrow, grey partridge, willow tit, dunnock, bullfinch, starling, song thrush and lapwing.
The endangered willow tit has been seen and it is hoped skylarks and lapwings will appear.
Boreal Owl, Aegolius funereus [Korpimaki 1985]; Tree Swallow, Tachycineta bicolor [Rendell and Robertson 1989]; Willow Tit, Poecile montanus [Ludescher 1973]; Marsh Tit, P.
It is an area of Special Scientific Interest due to its wet woodland habitat which is rare in Cheshire and it's home to less common birds like the willow tit.
Marsh and willow tit nests are particularly vulnerable to attack, so the increase in great spot numbers may explain the decline of these two species and the recent sharp fall in numbers of lesser spotted woodpeckers may also be attributable to predation from their larger cousins.
BIRD SPOTTING RECENT sightings at the RSPB's Sandwell Valley Nature Reserve include goosander, shoveler, goldeneye, great spotted woodpecker, willow tit, siskin and bullfinch.
The report also shows woodland birds willow warbler, spotted flycatcher and willow tit have dramatically decreased in the region, although great spotted woodpecker has increased by more than 100%.
What you can see all year round are members of the tit family: the blue tit, willow tit, marsh tit, crested tit, great tit, and others.
Other declining and nationally rare species which should benefit from the restoration include wood warbler, willow tit, cuckoo, tree pipit, goshawk and badger.